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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Shrimp industry
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Record #:
6936
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North Carolina has a long history of shrimping. Commercial shrimping began in the early days of the 20th-century and centered around the Southport area. Three species of shrimp are caught in the state's coastal waters -- the brown, pink, and white. Green discusses the history of shrimping from Native American times to the present; boats and equipment used; and legal and environmental issues.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2004, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7028
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North Carolina shrimpers are facing economic and cultural challenges. Imported shrimp decreases domestic prices. Most shrimp imports are farm-raised, while domestic is wild-caught. The rising cost of gas and insurance premiums eat into profits. North Carolina shrimpers, whose way of life goes back several generations, see a way of life disappearing.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2004, p18-21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7721
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Shrimping is an important industry in the state. Recently high coats of fuel and low market prices have driven many shrimpers out of business. Kenny Sessions, a native of Topsail Island, is a contractor by day. At night he fishes for shrimp with a homemade trap he has built. Sessions has been so successful that the North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant (FRG) is studying his invention to see if it has application for commercial and recreational shrimpers.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2006, p20-25, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8531
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Shrimp is one of the most popular seafood products in the country, but what most Americans do not realize is that 90 percent of the shrimp they are eating is imported. Over half of the imports are raised in ponds in Asia and South American and not caught in the wild. This has put the American shrimp industry at a disadvantage in trying to compete with the cheaper imports. Angione explores 'Wild American Shrimp,' a new marking effort of Wild American Shrimp, Inc. (WASI), the marketing arm of the Southern Shrimp Alliance (SSA), which seeks to promote the quality of American shrimp.
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Record #:
16325
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North Carolina's shrimpers face hard times from foreign competition and the current economic situation. At the present time foreign shrimp account for 90 percent of the market. Smith discusses how the federal Trade Adjustment and Assistance (TAA) for Farmers and Fishermen program is helping shrimpers get through the hard times.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2011, p21-25, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8171
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The shrimp fishery in North Carolina began about 1880, but its actual potential was not realized until 1923 when for the first time in the state's history, over a million pounds of shrimp were landed. The landings peaked in 1953, when fourteen million pounds were landed. Since then landings have fluctuated at a lower level with slightly over five million pounds landed in 1965. The brown, spotted, and white shrimp are the important commercial species of shrimp. In this first of two articles on shrimp and shrimp research, McCoy and McKenzie discuss the shrimp's life history, migration patterns, gear and methods of harvesting, vessels used, and the shrimping season.
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Record #:
30378
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In the last half of 1953, shrimp boats along North Carolina's coast were loaded. The July to December period produced the largest shrimp harvest in the state's history. Over 5 million pounds were caught adding to the state's over $16 million seafood industry.
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