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76 results for Water quality management
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Record #:
73
Author(s):
Abstract:
Biological criteria are descriptions of healthy communities of aquatic creatures by which the health of other aquatic communities can be judged.
Record #:
265
Author(s):
Abstract:
Municipal officials need state financial assistance to handle water supply and water quality concerns.
Source:
North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, June 1984, p66-74, il, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
1440
Author(s):
Abstract:
A new water quality management plan will divide the state into seventeen major river basins with an integrated, basinwide approach to replace previous piecemeal efforts. This plan calls for cooperation among local governments and the state.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Feb 1994, p7, por
Record #:
1986
Author(s):
Abstract:
Duplin County, one of the top ten agricultural counties in the U.S., received one of the first 37 Hydrologic Unit Projects nationwide. The projects aim to migrate the impact of agriculture on water quality.
Record #:
2117
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's approach to safeguarding water quality is to divide the state into seventeen river basins. Water quality problems are then identified and appropriate strategies developed for their remediation
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 45 Issue 1, Jan 1995, p9, il
Record #:
2475
Abstract:
Although nonpoint pollution (pollution not originating in a pipe) has such sources as mining, construction, and failing septic tanks, it took pollution spillage from collapsed hog waste lagoons to dramatize the need for closer management of this problem.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 45 Issue 8, Aug 1995, p8-9, il
Record #:
2591
Author(s):
Abstract:
Falls Lake, built to supply drinking water for Raleigh, could be threatened by controversial mapping and a vote by the Durham County Commissioners to allow Treyburn Industrial Park to build in the water quality critical area.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 46, Nov 1995, p11-13,15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2976
Author(s):
Abstract:
Runoff from agricultural fields, animal feedlots, and residential developments contribute to water quality degradation in the east. Riparian buffers strips are effective filters to keep pollutants from reaching streams and rivers.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 15 Issue 4, Summer 1996, p4-5, il
Record #:
3018
Author(s):
Abstract:
Natural vegetative buffers, or grasslands, shrubs, and forests that grow on banks of streams and rivers, are effective in filtering nonpoint pollutants and improving water quality.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1996, p12-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3450
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1996, the General Assembly created the N.C. Clean Water Management Trust Fund to deal with water pollution. The fund provides grants to groups for such projects as the restoration of degraded lands and building of riparian buffers.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 47 Issue 5, May 1997, p1,12, il, f
Record #:
3622
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Environmental Management Commission adopted in December, 1997, a plan to clean up and restore the Neuse River. The rules, which include agricultural nitrogen loading reduction, become effective August 1, 1998.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 48 Issue 1, Jan 1998, p1,5, il
Record #:
3629
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Environmental Management Commission approved on December 11, 1997, the Neuse River Nutrient Sensitive Waters Management Strategy. The new rules contain requirements for riparian buffers, wastewater discharge, and nutrient management.
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Record #:
3918
Author(s):
Abstract:
Riparian buffers, or wide strips of vegetation along stream and river banks, are effective filters in keeping pollutants from reaching the water. They also control erosion and attract wildlife. One of the most aggressive water pollution plans is a state-mandated one requiring retention of 50-foot-wide buffers on all Neuse River Basin streams.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 4, Fall 1998, p2-6, il
Record #:
4078
Author(s):
Abstract:
in October, 1999, an Environmental Protection Agency regulation requiring municipalities to report the quality of the drinking water to their citizens goes into effect. Items to be reported include where the water comes from, the contaminants it contains, and the health effects of any contaminants.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Jan 1999, p10, il