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11 results for Drinking water--Laws and legislation
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Record #:
4078
Author(s):
Abstract:
in October, 1999, an Environmental Protection Agency regulation requiring municipalities to report the quality of the drinking water to their citizens goes into effect. Items to be reported include where the water comes from, the contaminants it contains, and the health effects of any contaminants.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Jan 1999, p10, il
Record #:
10148
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wall reviews the scope of the new state regulations on drinking water wells and the authority of local governments to adopt more stringent local laws.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 88, May 2008, p1-11, f
Full Text:
Record #:
33294
Author(s):
Abstract:
Forty-six community water systems monitored by the North Carolina Division of Health Services have naturally occurring levels of radium high enough to violate drinking water standards for groundwater supplies. Operators of these non-compliant water systems must develop a remedial action plan to bring the water supply into compliance with regulatory standards. Several options are discussed in this article.
Record #:
33459
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Environmental Protection Agency is enforcing new standards for radionucleotides in response to requirements of the new Safe Drinking Water Act. Twenty-eight public and private water systems in North Carolina have been ordered to comply with radium standards. Research is being conducted on identification of radon in high-risk groundwater areas.
Record #:
34194
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a project sponsored by the North Carolina Urban Water Consortium, university investigators have concluded that the urban water utilities they studied may need to improve removal of disinfection by-products from drinking water to meet requirements of the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1986. They also conclude that requirements for removal of synthetic organic chemicals and volatile organic chemicals will probably not have a major impact on the utilities.
Record #:
34210
Author(s):
Abstract:
The National Governors’ Association proposed a freeze on implementation of current regulations and moratorium on new regulations under the Safe Drinking Water Act Amendments of 1986. While other states perceive a crisis in the nation’s drinking water program, North Carolina representatives claim the state’s drinking water program is stable because it took steps in time to avert one. State drinking water administrators would prefer flexibility in establishing local priorities.
Record #:
34234
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s new “Information Collection Rule” is likely to mean at least two-million-dollars in monitoring, laboratory and reporting costs and pilot programs for North Carolina’s large water utilities over the next few years. The new rule convened in 1992 to address limits on disinfection by-products, which are suspected in drinking water, and create new requirements for removing microbial contaminants from poor-quality surface waters.
Record #:
34233
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Environmental Health has submitted to the Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources an expanded budget request of more than two-million-dollars to provide for improved enforcement of the state’s safe drinking water program. The request was spurred by United States Environmental Protection Agency concerns about the level of resources devoted to enforcing Safe Drinking Water Act regulations.
Record #:
34232
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Environmental Protection Agency has notified the North Carolina Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources that the agency is “very concerned” with the state of North Carolina’s Public Water Supply Supervision Program. The state was directed to perform a needs assessment to determine how to improve enforcement of Safe Drinking Water Act regulations by September 30.
Record #:
34250
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dr. Philip Singer of the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill is looking for ways to help water utilities in North Carolina out of a regulatory dilemma regarding maximum contaminant levels in water treatment. Singer will explore the possibility that elevating the pH of coagulated and settled water prior to the application of chlorine can control disinfection levels.
Record #:
34356
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sherry MacQueen, the new source water protection coordinator in the North Carolina Public Water Supply Section, discusses the condition of all public drinking water sources and local partnerships to protect streams, reservoirs, and wells that supply public drinking water systems. MacQueen also discusses assessments of risk to drinking water sources and the state’s Water Supply Watershed Protection program.