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12 results for Environmental Protection Agency
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Record #:
8391
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's population is growing. Electric cooperatives that have primarily served rural areas are adapting to service more families and commercial facilities in places that were recently croplands and woodlands. Top executives in three of North Carolina's fastest-growing cooperatives discuss changes that are occurring in their service areas: Union County; Ashe and Watauga Counties; and the Albemarle Sound area.
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Full Text:
Record #:
25148
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Environmental Protection Agency is funding a clean-up of the Pamlico-Albemarle to eliminate the problems it faces.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Summer 1986, p1, 5, map
Record #:
25156
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Environmental Protection Agency’s cleanup plan is starting to be put into motion with a project coordinator having been appointed.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, Winter 1987, p1
Record #:
25331
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several conservation agencies are standing behind the Environmental Protection Agency’s decision to elevate the pending permit decision for phosphate mining in Beaufort County.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 28 Issue 1, Spring 2009, p1
Record #:
25338
Abstract:
The Environmental Protection Agency has quietly backed off the permit proposal of PCS Phosphate. With this development, PCS Phosphate will be able to mine around 4,000 acres of wetlands.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 28 Issue 2, Summer 2009, p11
Record #:
27485
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a result of the health problems at the Caldwell Systems, Inc. incinerator in Caldwell County, the Environmental Protection Agency is launching a nationwide “strike force.” This will trigger a nationwide review of incinerators and their effect on local populations. The NC case could be the case that leads to radical changes in hazardous waste management. A strategy calling for waste reduction and recycling is favored by experts as the hazardous waste totals are increasing nationwide.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 32, August 8-14 1990, p9-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
33483
Author(s):
Abstract:
Over the next several years, the Environmental Protection Agency will push for increased use of biological toxicity testing to complement chemical-specific analyses of toxic water pollutants. North Carolina has been a leader among the authorized state programs in the use of biological testing to monitor and control toxics, largely because the state has in-house effluent monitoring capability.
Record #:
33581
Author(s):
Abstract:
A study of water quality problems in the nation’s streams and rivers has revealed that the worst problems are caused by nonpoint source pollution. In response, the Environmental Protection Agency shifted responsibility for pollution control from federal to state programs. North Carolina has already made substantial progress in assessing water pollution problems, and is soliciting public comments on watershed priorities.
Record #:
34234
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Environmental Protection Agency’s new “Information Collection Rule” is likely to mean at least two-million-dollars in monitoring, laboratory and reporting costs and pilot programs for North Carolina’s large water utilities over the next few years. The new rule convened in 1992 to address limits on disinfection by-products, which are suspected in drinking water, and create new requirements for removing microbial contaminants from poor-quality surface waters.
Record #:
34233
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Environmental Health has submitted to the Department of Environment, Health, and Natural Resources an expanded budget request of more than two-million-dollars to provide for improved enforcement of the state’s safe drinking water program. The request was spurred by United States Environmental Protection Agency concerns about the level of resources devoted to enforcing Safe Drinking Water Act regulations.
Record #:
34253
Author(s):
Abstract:
On October 24, the Neuse River Foundation notified the United States Environmental Protection Agency that it intends to sue the Agency for not requiring North Carolina to set total maximum daily loads for pollutants that are degrading the lower Neuse River and other streams. The Agency is already dealing with many citizen suits regarding the Clean Water Act. Trevor Clements, a former state regulator, discusses the need for flexible strategies in basin-wide planning.
Record #:
34266
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eighty-four more cities and urbanized counties in North Carolina and all construction sites larger than one acre will be required to get permits and manage storm water runoff under rules proposed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in January. The Phase II Storm Water regulations will expand the national program to regulate storm water discharges as point sources under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES).