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10 results for Hazardous waste--Management
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Record #:
18557
Abstract:
North Carolina, like many other states, has placed a high priority on the safe management of hazardous wastes. Despite several catastrophes, the state has taken a positive approach to the regulation of hazardous wastes through such mechanisms as the regulatory agency, the Solid and Hazardous Waste Management Branch of the Department of Human Resources.
Source:
Record #:
27378
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Jim Martin and the state of North Carolina are struggling to find a home for their hazardous waste. A planned incinerator has been rejected in 15 counties due to citizen opposition and concern for public health. One solution is the forthcoming bill named the Toxic Use Reduction Act which proposes a shift toward toxic waste reduction and commitment to clean manufacturing rather than hazardous waste disposal. Businesses, politicians, and environmentalists believe a solution can be met if all sides are willing to compromise.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 8, Feb. 20-26 1991, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
27451
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two years after the hazardous waste incinerator in Caldwell County has been shut down, residents of the county and former employees of the incinerator company are experiencing serious health problems. Evidence suggests the state of NC knew that the incinerator was violating EPA and health regulations but did nothing to shut the company down. State officials dispute those claims, but questions remain as to how much the state actually knew, why it failed to regulate the company, and what it means for a proposed incinerator, and the future protection of NC citizens from hazardous waste pollution.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 15, April 12-18 1990, p10-15 Periodical Website
Record #:
27469
Author(s):
Abstract:
The hazardous waste incinerator in Caldwell County was closed in May 1988 by the county for numerous violations. Newly discovered state documents show that Governor Jim Martin knew in September 1987 that pollution from the incinerator was making Caldwell County residents sick and did nothing about it. The evidence against the governor from citizens, local doctors, and public health officials is examined. Governor Martin plans to open a new incinerator in NC within the next two years and is telling citizens it will be safe.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 26, July 18-24 1990, p7-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
27485
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a result of the health problems at the Caldwell Systems, Inc. incinerator in Caldwell County, the Environmental Protection Agency is launching a nationwide “strike force.” This will trigger a nationwide review of incinerators and their effect on local populations. The NC case could be the case that leads to radical changes in hazardous waste management. A strategy calling for waste reduction and recycling is favored by experts as the hazardous waste totals are increasing nationwide.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 32, August 8-14 1990, p9-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
27484
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Jim Martin claims that he had no proof or authority to shut down the Caldwell County incinerator responsible for environmental and public health violations. The evidence suggests the governor and state officials could have acted and chose not to. The federal government has launched a comprehensive health study in response to the incident which may prompt EPA action.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 32, August 8-14 1990, p9-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
29417
Author(s):
Abstract:
While North Carolina has seen its fair share of issues in dealing with the management of hazardous wastes, a Greensboro, North Carolina based company is compiling a list of firsts in commercial management of such materials. Ecoflo has become the first company in the US to open a permitted commercial hazardous waste treatment facility under the federal Resource Conservation Act; the first to train personnel to help clients handle wastes; and the first to turn liquid mercury into a disposable solid.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 1, Jan 1992, p6, por
Record #:
29424
Author(s):
Abstract:
To deal openly and frankly with a disconcerting topic--hazardous waste management--Cleveland County, North Carolina's leaders, industrialists, and educators have come together to form the Cleveland County Industrial Environmental Exchange (CCIEE). The group works as a mechanism for educating the public, sharing information, and promoting awareness of and compliance with laws.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 50 Issue 1, January 1992, p28-29, por
Record #:
32525
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hazardous wastes have become a serious problem in North Carolina, especially with the state’s strong ties to agriculture and industry. O.W. Strickland, head of the Solid and Hazardous Waste Management Branch of the Department of Human Resources, discusses hazardous waste management and regulations.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 39 Issue 3, Mar 1981, p34-48, il, por
Record #:
33354
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is one of the major waste-producing states in the nation, yet, the number of facilities for treatment and storage of hazardous wastes in North Carolina continues to decline. Reasons for the decline are siting limitations, strict regulations, and high cost of liability insurance. Closure of facilities has led to other problems and concerns.