NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for Pollution
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
11012
Author(s):
Abstract:
Smith reports on scientists who are documenting an array of chemicals, including mercury, in the Lower Cape Fear region that pose human health and environmental concerns.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2009, p22-23, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25129
Author(s):
Abstract:
A program was instituted to clean up the rivers and streams in Edgecombe County. There are several steps to the program and participants haggled over details.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 4 Issue 1, Autumn 1984, p3
Record #:
25147
Author(s):
Abstract:
An organization has been formed to evaluate the impact of runoff from phosphate mines. In addition, each impact is explained as to its harm and why the committee is looking to evaluate it.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Spring 1986, p4
Record #:
25258
Author(s):
Abstract:
As part of the international waterways clean-up effort about 30 volunteers turned out to collect about 1200 pounds of trash over 2 hours from Jack’s Creek. Trash collected ranged from the typical beer cans and 2-liters to bike frames and a shopping cart.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 21 Issue 4, Fall 2002, p3, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
25293
Author(s):
Abstract:
Grady McCallie sheds light on how the Environmental Management Commission makes rules and how the EMC works as an organization as well as what they do.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 24 Issue 3, Summer 2005, p6-7, il
Record #:
26588
Author(s):
Abstract:
The top 500 polluters in the nation, eleven of which are in North Carolina, have been named in the National Wildlife Federation’s Toxic 500 Report. These companies release the largest amount of cancer-causing and health-endangering pollutants into the air and water.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 36 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1989, p5, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
27387
Author(s):
Abstract:
The old Cary Health Farm, the former site of the Division of Environmental Management, has been contaminated with hazardous waste. Questionable laboratory practices contributed to high levels of mercury, silver, cadmium, DDT, and other hazardous chemicals found in soil tests. The practices and contamination have been known for at least five years and there is some evidence to suggest that officials knew about contamination for longer and did nothing about it. The state is trying to sell the property.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 9 Issue 16, April 1991, p10-13 Periodical Website
Record #:
27484
Author(s):
Abstract:
Governor Jim Martin claims that he had no proof or authority to shut down the Caldwell County incinerator responsible for environmental and public health violations. The evidence suggests the governor and state officials could have acted and chose not to. The federal government has launched a comprehensive health study in response to the incident which may prompt EPA action.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 32, August 8-14 1990, p9-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
28834
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hurricane Matthew flooded a Duke Energy power plant in Goldsboro, unleashing toxic coal ash into the Neuse River. The level of arsenic in the groundwater monitoring well on this site is the highest of any of their coal ash sites around the state. Duke officials are being pressured to excavate the ash.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 41, Oct 2016, p8-9, il, por Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
36453
Author(s):
Abstract:
The newly created office aimed to assure its sustained place by playing a role in sustaining the environment. Two years later, post-implementation of its Sustainability Management Plan, the department had lived up to its promise of sustainability. The city, partnering with local environmental groups, had reduced its carbon footprint by nearly thirty percent, through eco-friendly practices related to fuel, electricity, water system improvement, and recycling.