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9 results for Stormwater runoff--Solutions to
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Record #:
20666
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rain gardens are becoming a very popular addition to landscapes in North and South Carolina. Not only do they attract bees, birds, butterflies, and beneficial insects, but they are a helpful solution to stormwater runoff problems. Anderson describes construction of a rain garden.
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Record #:
25066
Author(s):
Abstract:
Storm water regulations are hard to enforce. However, the city of Smithfield has found a way to do it through wetlands with great success. It has helped not only the storm water pollution, but the community as well.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2004, p16-20, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25304
Author(s):
Abstract:
Heather Jacobs defines stormwater and how a seemingly harmless word can mean big problems for North Carolina. However, she also describes solutions to prevent these potential problems.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 26 Issue 4, Fall 2007, p1-2
Record #:
33189
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent permit requests for North Carolina coastal residential development, mostly duplexes and condominiums, have heightened conflicts between developers and shellfish producers. Rainfall runoff from high-density urban and resort developments can impact the quality and quantity of stormwater and frequently results in pollution of shellfish waters.
Record #:
33352
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development has proposed new rules for storm water control. Storm water runoff from coastal development is a major problem because it contaminates fragile shellfish waters in North Carolina. This article discusses the issue and reviews the proposed rules.
Record #:
33402
Author(s):
Abstract:
Construction on the Outer Banks of North Carolina is resulting in the creation of large expanses of impervious areas. Disposing of the runoff from these areas during storms in a manner that is not detrimental to the adjacent sounds and ocean is among the most pressing water management problems confronting the developers and public officials in this area. This article discusses the issue, potential design problems, the water table, and artificial drainage.
Record #:
33489
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina residents are recognizing that stormwater runoff from coastal development or soil erosion can cause serious pollution problems. However, there is less public understanding of how urban stormwater runoff contributes to degradation of water quality across the state. The issue of urban stormwater management for water quality purposes presses the need for regulations and legislative revisions.
Record #:
34156
Author(s):
Abstract:
The City of Raleigh has proposed a stormwater management policy to address the effects of increased runoff on structures and other components of drainage systems that carry storm runoff to larger streams and rivers. It also addresses the effects of stormwater discharges on water quality in receiving streams and rivers.
Record #:
34323
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Quality drafted a response to a petition filed by the North Carolina Coastal Federation to require Brunswick County to obtain an NPDES Storm Water Phase I permit prior to being issued authorizations for construction of the East-West Brunswick Regional Wastewater Treatment Facilities. The petition asks that Brunswick County obtain a storm water permit to regulate storm water discharges because of reports concluding that shellfish closures in the area result from storm water runoff.