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5 results for Water table--North Carolina
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Record #:
13645
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's water situation is that pollution and drought kill the surface supply but the water table is not falling.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 25, Nov 1951, p3-4, il
Full Text:
Record #:
33402
Author(s):
Abstract:
Construction on the Outer Banks of North Carolina is resulting in the creation of large expanses of impervious areas. Disposing of the runoff from these areas during storms in a manner that is not detrimental to the adjacent sounds and ocean is among the most pressing water management problems confronting the developers and public officials in this area. This article discusses the issue, potential design problems, the water table, and artificial drainage.
Record #:
34320
Author(s):
Abstract:
In cooperation with the Lumber River Council of Governments, the United States Geological Survey assessed the effects of groundwater withdrawals on water levels in the southern Coastal Plain area of the Black Creek aquifer. Between September 1992 and December 1998, groundwater levels were monitored in twenty-one wells screened in Black Creek aquifer throughout Bladen, Hoke, Robeson, and Scotland counties. Results showed that water levels have changed little in most of this area, but have declined in some areas due to pumping.
Record #:
34318
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources has been documenting declining water levels in the Central Coastal Plain Cretaceous aged aquifers (Upper Cape Fear, Black Creek and Peedee) since the late 1960s and has been discussing the problems of declining aquifer levels with users since 1993. A request for approval of Central Coastal Plain Capacity Use Area rules was delayed until December to allow for fine-tuning and improvements to the rule.
Record #:
38291
Author(s):
Abstract:
Profiled are Calvary Episcopal Church and Churchyard, Tarboro; Old Burying Ground, Beaufort; St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Bath; Oakdale Cemetery, Wilmington. Accompanying photos of cemeteries and tombstones was information such as brief church histories and cemeteries’ unique qualities. As for their tombstones, they are utilitarian and decorative, indicating aspects such as religious affiliation; economic status; relationship to other families in the cemetery; evidence or absence of kinship to the Coastal Plain region’s earliest settlers.
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