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13 results for Aquifers
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Record #:
17492
Abstract:
North Carolina is attempting to stave off water shortage problems by conducting surveys of the below-surface water conditions in the Piedmont.
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Record #:
25249
Author(s):
Abstract:
Greenville Utilities recounts how it selected the site for its Aquifer Storage and Recovery from the first step to the benefits of using such a technology.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 20 Issue 4, Fall 2001, p3, il
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Record #:
32312
Author(s):
Abstract:
Texas Gulf Sulphur Company’s Beaufort County mining complex is a massive investment toward the recovery and processing of phosphate, a material which forms one of the basic ingredients of fertilizers. The mining complex is situated on an inlet of the Pamlico River, and overlies the Castle Hayne Aquifer. This article discusses concerns over mining operations, groundwater conditions, pollution, and legislation.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 27 Issue 3, Mar 1969, p22-37, il, por
Record #:
32942
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has vast supplies of underground water aquifers. As the population and industry development rise, there is concern about how to protect water resources from pollution. Without proper control, runoff of phosphorus and other nutrients can cause excessive growth of unwanted algae.
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Record #:
33293
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Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey’s second annual National Water Summary released this summer is dedicated to state ground water data. The North Carolina section shows maps and tables of aquifers and major areas of ground water withdrawals. The report also reviews the most significant hydrologic and water-related events of 1984.
Record #:
33542
Author(s):
Abstract:
To protect the largest stand of maritime forest left on the Outer Banks and the Cape Hatteras Aquifer, which provides water to most of the residents in the area, the North Carolina Division of Coastal Management has proposed designating the Buxton Woods area as an Area of Environmental Concern. The designation would restrict development in Buxton Woods, and the proposal has created controversy.
Record #:
34080
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey, the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development, and local governments in North Carolina’s Coastal Plain area are cooperating on a study of the hydrology and groundwater resource potential of the Castle Hayne Aquifer in Eastern North Carolina. The study will produce a series of hydrogeologic maps that will be useful in planning and constructing water wells and test holes.
Record #:
34171
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey published the results of a study begun in 1983 to better understand and define the groundwater flow system in the central Coastal Plain of North Carolina. The report contains detailed narrative descriptions of Cretaceous aquifers as well as detailed maps of each aquifer. A summary of the aquifers and table are presented in this article.
Record #:
34256
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources is reassessing its regulation of groundwater and surface water withdrawals in Capacity Use Area #1, a multicounty area centered around Beaufort County. The Division is conducting an aquifer framework analysis and modeling groundwater flow in the Castle Hayne Aquifer as a basis for reviewing future groundwater withdrawal permit applications and assessing whether continued regulation of withdrawals in the area is necessary.
Record #:
34320
Author(s):
Abstract:
In cooperation with the Lumber River Council of Governments, the United States Geological Survey assessed the effects of groundwater withdrawals on water levels in the southern Coastal Plain area of the Black Creek aquifer. Between September 1992 and December 1998, groundwater levels were monitored in twenty-one wells screened in Black Creek aquifer throughout Bladen, Hoke, Robeson, and Scotland counties. Results showed that water levels have changed little in most of this area, but have declined in some areas due to pumping.
Record #:
34318
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Division of Water Resources has been documenting declining water levels in the Central Coastal Plain Cretaceous aged aquifers (Upper Cape Fear, Black Creek and Peedee) since the late 1960s and has been discussing the problems of declining aquifer levels with users since 1993. A request for approval of Central Coastal Plain Capacity Use Area rules was delayed until December to allow for fine-tuning and improvements to the rule.
Record #:
34328
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina General Assembly funded a series of studies in response to concerns of residents of Brunswick and Columbus counties about sedimentation, poor water quality, and biological impairment in the Waccamaw River. The studies found indication of high diversity ecosystems, and a major flow of groundwater from the underlying Pee Dee aquifer. The aquifer system represents an economically important source of groundwater throughout the North Carolina Coastal Plain.
Record #:
34344
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission directed the Division of Water Resources to conduct a Capacity Use Investigation of the area in and around Bladen County, and to provide a report and recommendations. Dewatering of the Upper Cape Fear Aquifer underlying the area appears to be imminent, and without declaring a Capacity Use Area, the Commission has no authority to limit groundwater withdrawals from the aquifer.