NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Geological surveys
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
12280
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1817 Denison Olmsted was appointed professor of chemistry at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He also had an intense interest in the geology and mineral resources of the state and proposed to the North Carolina Legislature that they hire him to do a survey. Turned down at first, he was later hired by them for the summers of 1824 and 1825. The Olmsted Survey has often been referred to as the first geological survey in the United States and was the first geological work which included publications (most notably The American Journal of Science) carried out at public expense.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 5, Aug 1971, p7-8, il
Full Text:
Record #:
34179
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey has launched the National Water Quality Assessment Program to evaluate the quality of the nation’s groundwater and surface water, and the natural and human factors that affect quality of these resources. Proposed study units in North Carolina are the Albemarle-Pamlico Drainage, the Upper Tennessee River Basin, and the Santee Basin and Coastal Drainage.
Record #:
34184
Author(s):
Abstract:
The rocks underlying the Blue Ridge and Piedmont provinces of North Carolina have the reputation of furnishing only small quantities of groundwater. According to a recent report by the United States Geological Survey, this impression is the result of the drilling of large numbers of low-yielding domestic wells without regard to geology, topography, and optimal construction.
Record #:
34183
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey recently released two reports on groundwater quality studies conducted at the United States Marine Corps Air Station, Cherry Point, North Carolina. The studies were undertaken in response to the increasing water supply needs of the Air Station and the potential for contamination of the Castle Hayne aquifer by waste disposal and spills. A summary of the results is provided in this article.
Record #:
34182
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to the recently released United States Geological Survey, “National Water Summary 1987,” North Carolina withdrew about 7,880 million gallons per day of freshwater from surface- and ground-water sources in 1985. Summary results and statistics for the state’s water use are provided in this article.
Record #:
34171
Author(s):
Abstract:
The United States Geological Survey published the results of a study begun in 1983 to better understand and define the groundwater flow system in the central Coastal Plain of North Carolina. The report contains detailed narrative descriptions of Cretaceous aquifers as well as detailed maps of each aquifer. A summary of the aquifers and table are presented in this article.