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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Water pollution
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Record #:
16916
Abstract:
Nutrient pollution is a potential problem in North Carolina's coastal plain waters because of the large percentage of land in agricultural use, which adds high levels of nitrogen and phosphorus to the fields in the forms of fertilizers and animal wastes.
Source:
North Carolina Geographer (NoCar F 254.8 N67), Vol. 7 Issue , 1999, p39-46, map, bibl, f
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Record #:
24266
Author(s):
Abstract:
In February of 2014, a pipe at Duke Energy's retired Eden coal plant ruptured into the Dan River, polluting the water with toxic coal ash, arsenic, and cadmium. The company originally faced a fine of $25 million, but recently the N.C. Department of Environmental Quality (DEQ) privately negotiated with Duke Energy and cut the fine to $7 million.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 32 Issue 40, October 2015, p7, 9, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25191
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Abstract:
The Girl Scout Council for Coastal Carolina is hitting some walls when it comes to trying to renew their NPDES permit for discharging wastewater into the Pamlico River.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Winter 1992, p3, il
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Record #:
25346
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many people have old prescriptions lying around. These are disposed of according to the current regulation of flushing them. This contaminates the drinking water and the water of marine ecosystems. The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation has a recommended solution.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 29 Issue 1, Spring 2010, p1-2
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Record #:
25725
Author(s):
Abstract:
Harmful algae blooms often occur in China’s third largest lake, Taihu. According to marine biologist Hans Paerl, nutrient-rich sewage from wastewater plants and pollution from factories are the main culprits. Paerl is working with Chinese scientists to recommend pollution controls that could help restore water quality in the lake.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 25 Issue 1, Fall 2008, p38-39, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25948
Author(s):
Abstract:
Preliminary findings have discovered that organic water pollution is creating the conditions for disease among game fish in North Carolina’s fishing lakes. The disease, which has been found to be present in all southeastern states, produces sores lesions on the fish skin, scales, and mouths. Pollution from sewage, industrial waste, and runoff produce the conditions which favor the condition to be spread among populations; however, at the time there is no particular solution except to limit pollution into the river and lake systems.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 17 Issue 1, 1974, p6
Record #:
27521
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Abstract:
This is Part 2 of a 3-part series on water pollution in the Triangle area. The sources of the Triangle’s water pollution are examined. The majority of pollution is from toxins that run off of city streets caused by citizens. Farmers account for 17 percent of the problem and industry and faulty sewage treatment facilities account for 16 percent. The governments role in regulation and what can be done is also examined.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 10, May 4-10 1989, p7-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27523
Author(s):
Abstract:
Part 3 of a three part series on the water pollution in the Triangle focuses on how the area and residents can fix the problem. The Triangle area has some of the sickest rivers and lakes in the state. Seven solutions are presented. Better regulations, technology upgrades, limiting growth, and citizen action through recycling and conservation are the just some of the simple solutions put forth.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 11, May 11-18 1989, p8-10 Periodical Website
Record #:
27567
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Shiloh Coalition for Community Control and Improvement’s fight for clean water and responsible local industry has earned them regional and national recognition. The EPA recognized the group for getting people to act after the Beazer Company leaked chemicals into area groundwater. The group has managed to put public pressure on the company and the company is paying for town access to city water. The group is praised for its excellent example of cooperation among residents toward a common goal. , especially between black and white citizens.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 7 Issue 37, November 16-22 1989, p11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28117
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jordan Lake is a foot over its capacity and during the severe drought, Triangle area municipalities are exploring how to take water from the lake. The problem is that these same municipalities contributed to the extreme pollution currently affecting the lake and do not take care of their own water resources. Instead of fighting over the lake now, municipalities should commit to water conservation efforts to protect water resources for now and the future.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 25 Issue 10, March 2008, p13 Periodical Website
Record #:
28250
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Neuse River has been placed on the Top 10 Most Endangered Rivers list. The river is on the list due to the recent development that has exploded around the Raleigh area. The growth has led to a strain on the river due to additional people in the area, water demand, and an increase in wastewater discharges. The various ways in which area residents are creating the problem are explored with commentary from experts.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 20, May 2007, p5-7 Periodical Website
Record #:
28332
Abstract:
Three New Hanover County, North Carolina tidal creeks were sampled for optical brighteners (compounds added to laundry detergents) and fecal coliform bacteria. Simultaneous testing for fecal bacteria and optical brighteners was shown to be a viable procedure for detecting human sources of fecal microbial pollution in waterways.
Record #:
31446
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Abstract:
In 2014, a ruptured pipe spilled as much as 39,000 tons of coal ash into the Dan River in Eden, NC. This article provides an update on Duke Energy’s progress on the cleanup.
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Record #:
32942
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Abstract:
North Carolina has vast supplies of underground water aquifers. As the population and industry development rise, there is concern about how to protect water resources from pollution. Without proper control, runoff of phosphorus and other nutrients can cause excessive growth of unwanted algae.
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Record #:
33181
Author(s):
Abstract:
This report examines several problems that make the design of a monitoring program a complex undertaking. It also reviews existing monitoring programs in North Carolina and makes recommendations. Several water quality monitoring programs are being operated in North Carolina, including those operated by state and federal agencies and self-monitoring by water suppliers and waste dischargers subject to regulations.