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11 results for Neuse River
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Record #:
2267
Author(s):
Abstract:
While the state feels it is doing a good job of water-quality protection, a top-ten EPA rating on pollutants released into the ecosystem causes environmentalists and citizens groups to question the state's support of anti-pollution regulations.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 16, Apr 1995, p12-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
2763
Abstract:
With pollution plaguing the Neuse River, the N.C. Environmental Management Commission has adopted, in concept, strategies to regulate nonpoint source and point source pollution.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Feb 1996, p1,7
Record #:
2918
Author(s):
Abstract:
Because of their efficiency in filtering nutrients, sediments, and pathogens, the creation of streamside buffers and wetlands restoration are two approaches to returning the Neuse River to a healthy condition.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 1996, p11, il
Record #:
3622
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Environmental Management Commission adopted in December, 1997, a plan to clean up and restore the Neuse River. The rules, which include agricultural nitrogen loading reduction, become effective August 1, 1998.
Source:
Southern City (NoCar Oversize JS 39 S6), Vol. 48 Issue 1, Jan 1998, p1,5, il
Record #:
3629
Author(s):
Abstract:
The N.C. Environmental Management Commission approved on December 11, 1997, the Neuse River Nutrient Sensitive Waters Management Strategy. The new rules contain requirements for riparian buffers, wastewater discharge, and nutrient management.
Full Text:
Record #:
3987
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rick Dove, riverkeeper for the Neuse River, received an INDEPENDENT 1998 Citizen Award for his forceful advocacy of cleaning up the waterway and its tributaries. He became the state's first riverkeeper in 1993
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 16 Issue 46, Nov 1998, p21, por Periodical Website
Record #:
24342
Author(s):
Abstract:
Though the condition of the Neuse River has improved over the years after textile mills and other factories stopped dumping waste into it, environmentalists agree it has a long way to go before the river quality is back to what it should be.
Record #:
25976
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Neuse River offers one of the finest areas for game habitat such as squirrels. However, some stretches of the river and its tributaries are in danger of being flooded by the Fall of Neuse Reservoir completion.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 2, Mar-Apr 1975, p22
Record #:
2357
Abstract:
Because of pollution and other problems, the Neuse River Foundation in 1993 hired Rick Dove as riverkeeper, to oversee the Neuse. He is the nation's eleventh riverkeeper and the only one in the state.
Full Text:
Record #:
3592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Removal of the Quaker Neck Dam on the Neuse River near Goldsboro opens up 75 miles of the river, plus tributaries, to spawning fish, including striped bass. Built in 1952, the 260-foot dam was the first one in the state removed for environmental reasons.
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Record #:
28250
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Neuse River has been placed on the Top 10 Most Endangered Rivers list. The river is on the list due to the recent development that has exploded around the Raleigh area. The growth has led to a strain on the river due to additional people in the area, water demand, and an increase in wastewater discharges. The various ways in which area residents are creating the problem are explored with commentary from experts.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 24 Issue 20, May 2007, p5-7 Periodical Website