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15 results for Environmental protection--Citizen participation
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Record #:
2267
Author(s):
Abstract:
While the state feels it is doing a good job of water-quality protection, a top-ten EPA rating on pollutants released into the ecosystem causes environmentalists and citizens groups to question the state's support of anti-pollution regulations.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 13 Issue 16, Apr 1995, p12-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
3016
Author(s):
Abstract:
Initiated by Lundie Spence in 1987, N.C. Big Sweep is a linkage of individuals and public and private groups united to clear the state's waterways of aquatic debris. With 12,500 volunteers, it is the country's largest statewide waterway cleanup program.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , July/Aug 1996, p16-20, il Periodical Website
Record #:
4462
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rising in Orange County, the Eno River flows thirty miles before merging with the Flat and Little rivers to form the Neuse. Yet this small river has been fought over by developers who wanted to exploit it and environmentalists who wanted to preserve it. In 1965, Margaret Nygard helped organize the Association for the Preservation of the Eno River, a group that defeated every attempt to spoil the river. Today the Eno River State Park stands as a monument to their perseverance.
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Record #:
5482
Author(s):
Abstract:
Asphalt plants in Durham are required to be 1,500 feet from where people live. However, a plan to build ten new plants and reduce the distance to homes to 600 feet almost got to the city council for a vote before citizens found out about it. The plants would also be built in Durham's poorer, inner city communities. Strom discusses how behind-the-scenes lobbying puts citizens at a disadvantage in cases like this and how citizens are reacting to the plan.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 19 Issue 8, Feb 2002, p17-21, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10227
Author(s):
Abstract:
Big Sweep in North Carolina is a volunteer effort started in 1987 to clean trash from beaches and waterways. The program is now in all 100 North Carolina counties. 18,000 volunteers retrieved over 720,000 pounds of trash in 2007. Now Big Sweep has produced a book to make middle school students aware of the need for a clean environment. The publication included eleven litter awareness lessons and was written by two North Carolina teachers.
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Record #:
15601
Author(s):
Abstract:
Big Sweep in North Carolina is a volunteer effort started in 1987 to clean trash from beaches and waterways. The program now functions in all the state's one hundred counties and receives broad-based backing from citizens and companies like Reynolds American, Duke Power, and First Citizens Banks. This autumn the program marks its twenty-fifth anniversary.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2011, p24-26, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
25172
Author(s):
Abstract:
Due to the frequency of recent environmental problems in the Pamlico River, an environmental response team has been developed to respond to these problems more quickly.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, Summer 1988, p1
Record #:
25174
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Pamlico-Tar River Foundation is looking to increase the efforts being made by the Division of Environmental Management to eliminate the red sores on fish and crabs in the Tar-Pamlico basin.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, Summer 1988, p5
Record #:
25183
Author(s):
Abstract:
A survey conducted by the Alemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study shows that people do have a high amount of trust in environmental groups and support the work they do.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 10 Issue 1, Fall 1990, p4
Record #:
26475
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina faces numerous environmental issues such as acid rain and global warming. While the government has a responsibility for managing the public’s welfare, citizens must communicate our concerns and respond with collective action.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1991, p13, il
Record #:
2541
Abstract:
The North Carolina Coastal Federation, with over 3,000 members and associations like the Pamlico-Tar River Foundation, is one of the most effective environmental advocacy groups in the state.
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Record #:
3912
Author(s):
Abstract:
When the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission acquired the Rollins Tract in 1998, the 17,829-acre purchase tripled the size of the South Mountains Game Lands. Lying in Cleveland and Rutherford counties, it, together with South Mountain State Park, now comprises over 35,000 acres of environmentally protected lands.
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Record #:
27730
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Abstract:
Duke Energy will dump 12 million tons of coal ash across the street from a Sanford trailer park. Duke Energy did not have to notify residents or ask local leaders for permission to do so or conduct a study to determine potential harm to human health and the environment according to state law. Planning for the site has been underway for months by Duke Energy and many local citizens and leaders are frustrated they were not made aware or allowed to voice concerns.
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Record #:
27974
Author(s):
Abstract:
The pageant is the winner of a 2010 IndyWeek Triangle Arts Award. The pageant’s goal is to protect and purchase ecologically significant areas in the Ellerbe creek Watershed area and in Durham’s urban environment. The pageant has contestants dress as beavers in drag costume and judges vote on the winners based on how much they are bribed.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 29, July 2010, p16 Periodical Website
Record #:
27977
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sludge from wastewater treatment plants is often applied to farmers’ fields as a free fertilizer. However, sludge poses health and environmental risks as its contents are unregulated. The sludge begins as human waste, manufacturing chemicals, and landfill runoff and after being applied to a farm field, it can be ingested by livestock or absorbed in crops. The contents of sludge are discussed and researchers and farms discuss the effects sludge can have on farms, people, and the environment.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 30, July 2010, p14-17 Periodical Website