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29 results for Foushee, Rodney
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Record #:
3778
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Abstract:
Funding to conserve nongame species, including songbirds and reptiles, is declining. Teaming with Wildlife, a national funding initiative, is a possible solution. If politicians agree, a small tax would be placed on outdoor equipment. This would earn $8 million for the state alone.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Spring 1998, p2-5, il
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Record #:
4085
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The state black bear record, and perhaps the world record, was broken in November, 1998, when Coy Parton killed an 880-pound bear near Vanceboro in Craven County. The bear exceeded the old state record by 160 pounds.
Record #:
4570
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The destruction by the Marines of the 250-foot-long concrete Rains Mill Dam on the Little River in Johnston County will open 50 more miles of the river to fish spawning. The dam stood for 71 years and was blown up in December 1999. It is the third dam on the Little and Neuse rivers to be removed for environmental purposes since 1997. The removal will help restore the ecosystem, river system, and fisheries.
Record #:
4587
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Abstract:
Core Sound was a sportsman's paradise for waterfowl shooting during the 19th- and early 20th-centuries. Wealthy hunters came from New York, New Jersey, and other northeastern states to shoot waterfowl and enjoy the comforts of clubs, including the Pilentary Hunting Club, Carteret Gun and Rod Club, and the Harbor Island Gun Club. Babe Ruth and future president Franklin D. Roosevelt were among the notables who hunted the area. Though the clubs are closed, their legacy of 100 years remains.
Record #:
4613
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The floods resulting from Hurricane Floyd's deluge were North Carolina's greatest natural disaster. Foushee assesses the impact the floods had on wildlife, fisheries, and the Pamlico Sound.
Record #:
4833
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Mercury is one of the earth's most poisonous substances. Coal-fired power plants, medical and municipal incinerators, and some mercury-using, chemical manufacturing plants contribute highly to North Carolina's mercury pollution problems. Because of elevated mercury levels in fish over the past decade, the state has issued advisories to avoid eating fish in ten eastern streams and one species in the Atlantic Ocean.
Record #:
26396
Author(s):
Abstract:
All North Carolina migratory game bird hunters are required to have a current Harvest Information Program (HIP) certification, in addition to a valid license while hunting during the 1997 season. The new program will help state wildlife agencies develop more reliable estimates of bird populations.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue (44)4, Fall 1997, p16
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Record #:
3213
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Abstract:
The N.C. Sea Turtle Stranding and Salvage Network reported 502 strandings in 1996, an increase of 44.6 percent from 1995. Carteret County had the most strandings. To date, scientists have yet to find a way to avoid this or why this phenomenon occurs.
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Record #:
3214
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Tag-A-Giant, the N.C. Giant Bluefin Tuna Conservation Series, is a combined research effort of scientists and anglers to tag one hundred bluefins caught off Cape Hatteras in 1997. Scientists hope to recover five to ten percent of the archival tags.
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Record #:
3342
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Fewer Canadian geese migrate to the Outer Banks each year. To understand more about migration patterns, wildlife managers are using geese specially equipped with transmitters that are tracked by the French-based ARGOS system.
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Record #:
3253
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Abstract:
The N.C. Wildlife Commission's new computerized Customer Support System can assign a boat number, record the information, and print a registration card and three-year decal in just seconds. This greatly reduces the possible sixty-day waiting period.
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Record #:
3341
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Beginning in July, 1997, all hunting, trapping, and fishing licenses and permits will be sold statewide using the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission's Customer Support System. Use of the computer wall mean less waiting time.
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Record #:
3339
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In the summer of 1996, the destructive forces of hurricanes Bertha and Fran caused widespread damage to woodlands and animal habitats far inland, to the Piedmont. Nature, though, has a built-in resiliency that provides for eventual recovery.
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Record #:
3523
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By the mid-1800s, elk were eliminated from the state. The Great Smoky Mountains National Park and other agencies are conducting studies to see if elk can be reintroduced in the park. If the report is favorable, fifty elk will be released in 1998.
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Record #:
3595
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Abstract:
The state's striped bass population declined during the 1970s. Because of migration patterns, multi-state cooperation was needed to manage recovery. The 1984 federal Atlantic Striped Bass Conservation Act accomplished this, and the bass is now restored.
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