NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


19 results for Fish populations
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 2
Next
Record #:
4570
Author(s):
Abstract:
The destruction by the Marines of the 250-foot-long concrete Rains Mill Dam on the Little River in Johnston County will open 50 more miles of the river to fish spawning. The dam stood for 71 years and was blown up in December 1999. It is the third dam on the Little and Neuse rivers to be removed for environmental purposes since 1997. The removal will help restore the ecosystem, river system, and fisheries.
Record #:
10150
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilson discusses catch-and-release fishing in North Carolina. The program came to the state in 1954 on trout streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The program is an approach to having more fish available to catch and emphasizes the recreational rather than the consumptive value of fish.
Full Text:
Record #:
25110
Author(s):
Abstract:
New research on genes that influence the quality of eggs in fish could help scientists develop answers and possible treatments for infertility in humans. More experiments are needed but scientists are optimistic.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
26381
Author(s):
Abstract:
In a joint project of the Carolina Power and Light Co., the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, and the Person-Caswell Lake Authority to improve fishing on Lake Hyco, artificial reefs are being created out of old tires and bricks.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 1, Winter 1979, p14, 18
Record #:
26648
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Waccamaw silverside is known to exist only in Lake Waccamaw and the upper Waccamaw River in North Carolina. Due to threats of eutrophication and poor water quality, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service has proposed to list the fish as threatened and to designate its critical habitat.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 33 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1986, p6
Record #:
710
Author(s):
Abstract:
After years of study, biologists are beginning to unlock some of the mysteries of our dwindling striped bass populations in Albemarle Sound and the Roanoke River.
Full Text:
Record #:
1384
Author(s):
Abstract:
Regulation of crappie populations is used to promote the development of larger fish, which sportsmen prefer.
Full Text:
Record #:
2441
Abstract:
Bass populations can be seriously threatened in the state's lakes and waterways by overfishing. The problem can be reduced by catch-and-release fishing. If properly handled after being caught, then quickly freed, the fish can survive for future sport.
Full Text:
Record #:
3595
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's striped bass population declined during the 1970s. Because of migration patterns, multi-state cooperation was needed to manage recovery. The 1984 federal Atlantic Striped Bass Conservation Act accomplished this, and the bass is now restored.
Full Text:
Record #:
5846
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bowara reports the results of a survey conducted by North Carolina Wildlife Resource Commission biologists between 1989 and 1996 on 17 trout streams \"to determine how trout and nontrout fish populations varied among streams from year to year.\"
Full Text:
Record #:
16908
Author(s):
Abstract:
At one time spotted bass were probably native to some stretches of rivers in the western part of the state; however, current populations have been introduced either by wildlife agency stocking programs of the 1970s, or more recently by fishermen. While anglers enjoy the fish's scrappiness, its introduction could have a negative impact on other bass. Ingram examines the state's four geographic reasons to see how spots are affecting other bass populations like large and smallmouth.
Full Text:
Record #:
28081
Author(s):
Abstract:
More than 13 million fish died in “fish kill events” in North Carolina in 2009 - the most since that data has been collected. The estimate is conservative and could actually be double the total. Graphs detailing the annual fish kill events from 1997 to 2009 and the reported annual fish kill mortality from 1997 to 2009 are presented. Most of the fish kill events occurred as a result of low oxygen in the water and pollution.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 26 Issue 51, December 2009, p6 Periodical Website
Record #:
28425
Author(s):
Abstract:
Atlantic midshipman fish were collected off North Carolina between 1911 to 2012, and four were found in Pamlico Sound. Once abundant their numbers have declined after 1990 when ocean water temperatures changed from cool to warm. Today they are rarely caught or seen in North Carolina.
Record #:
28428
Author(s):
Abstract:
Atlantic bumper fish were once common, but rarely caught today in North Carolina. Their decline seems to reflect a response to changing water temperatures, cooler pre-1990 and warmer post-1990.
Record #:
28418
Author(s):
Abstract:
Populations of eighty-six Atlantic Ocean marine fishes off North Carolina have changed during the last forty-five years. Examination of the ocean conditions and its fish faunal interrelationships explain reasons for these changes.
Subject(s):