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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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10 results for Artificial reefs
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Record #:
1062
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A multidisciplinary team has proposed a theory to account for the unusual occurrence of reef habitats in Onslow Bay.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1993, p2-7, por Periodical Website
Record #:
5218
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One of the nation's premier state-managed artificial reef programs is found in the waters off North Carolina's coastline. State involvement in the program began in the mid-1980s, and today the North Carolina Department of Marine Fisheries manages thirty-nine ocean sites and seven estuarine sites. Only three of the ocean reefs are over twenty miles offshore. Artificial reefs are used to increase fish habitats and areas for sports fishing.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2002, p6-11, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
26381
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In a joint project of the Carolina Power and Light Co., the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission, and the Person-Caswell Lake Authority to improve fishing on Lake Hyco, artificial reefs are being created out of old tires and bricks.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 1, Winter 1979, p14, 18
Record #:
6679
Author(s):
Abstract:
Artificial reefs are used to increase fish habitats and areas for sports fishing. The state is constructing its first artificial fishing reef off the coast of New Hanover County between Masonboro Inlet and Carolina Beach. The reef will be about a mile in length and about 200 yards wide. It will rise twelve feet from the ocean floor. A combination of old automobile bodies and large household appliances are being used in the construction.
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Record #:
6681
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Artificial reefs are used to increase fish habitats and areas for sports fishing. The state's first artificial fishing reef was constructed off the coast of New Hanover County between Masonboro Inlet and Carolina Beach in 1961. Dermid reports on how well the reef is attracting the small fish which in turn attract the big game fish.
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Record #:
9018
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Artificial reefs are used to increase fish habitats and areas for sports fishing by providing shelter and food. The idea is to attract smaller fish, and the larger ones will naturally follow. Building materials for reefs include automobile tires and sunken vessels. North Carolina's artificial saltwater reefs are located at Atlantic Beach, Wrightsville Beach, Carolina Beach, and Lockwood's Folly Inlet. Reefs at Carolina and Wrightsville beaches were constructed with sunken vessels.
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Record #:
9522
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Artificial reefs are used to increase fish habitats and areas for sports fishing. The authors discuss building a reef using worn out automobile tires and how they work after construction. One of the first large-scale artificial tire reefs was installed in Lake Gaston.
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Record #:
26874
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Two bills have proposed to establish a national artificial reef program that could benefit both fin and shell fishermen in the Atlantic. In addition to enhancing the marine environment, artificial reefs are also appealing because of the large amounts of waste materials they utilize.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 29 Issue 1, Jan 1982, p3
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Record #:
5900
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Abstract:
Artificial reefs are used to increase fish habitats and areas for sports fishing. Arrington discusses how the reefs are built and how they work.
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Record #:
35520
Author(s):
Abstract:
Artificial reefs, like the one built at Wrightsville Beach, improve fishing grounds by offering food and shelter sources. Among the details were factors for creating an artificial reef, prior attempts at constructing artificial reefs, data indicating a positive impact for South Carolina’s artificial reefs, and the Artificial Reef Program’s future sites along NC coastal waterways.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 2 Issue 2, June/July 1974, p22-24, 26-27