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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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70 results for Fishing
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Record #:
906
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Satellite technology is aiding North Carolina fishermen in various ways.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1992, p2-7, por Periodical Website
Record #:
986
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Talking with federal and state fisheries managers, policymakers, and representatives from commercial fishing organizations, the author outlines the problems and complexities facing today's commercial fishing industry in North Carolina.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1993, p2-7, por Periodical Website
Record #:
988
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The author interviews four North Carolina fishermen, who relate their frustrations and hopes for the future.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Jan/Feb 1993, p15-17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
2363
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Lake Gaston, which straddles the North Carolina-Virginia border, is a fisherman's paradise, offering some of the state's best game fishing. Some of its wide variety of species reach record size
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Record #:
4905
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In an interview with Business North Carolina, newly elected governor Mike Easley discusses a variety of issues, including campaign-finance reform in North Carolina, what he looks for in a new secretary of commerce, how to bring new jobs to rural areas and protect the environment there at the same time, and a state lottery.
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Record #:
4914
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In an interview with Steve Tuttle of NORTH CAROLINA magazine, newly-elected governor Mike Easley shares his thoughts on the Bill Lee Act, economic development in rural counties, educational priorities, and a tight budget.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 59 Issue 1, Jan 2001, p46-49, por
Record #:
5231
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Twenty-five public fishing piers, approximately one-fourth of all the fishing piers on the Atlantic Coast, jut out from the state's coastline from Kitty Hawk to Sunset Beach. Blackburn discusses the attraction the vulnerable, wooden structures have on people.
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Record #:
5290
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Alger G. Willis Fishing Camps, located on Core Banks, the southern part of the Cape Lookout National Seashore, have attracted anglers for over fifty years. Green describes the camps' history and what changes the years have brought.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Autumn 2002, p6-10, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7901
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In 1990, twenty-five public fishing piers, approximately one-fourth of all the fishing piers on the Atlantic Coast, jutted out from the state's coastline from Kitty Hawk to Sunset Beach. Kure Beach Pier, which open in 1923, was the first, and it has remained in the Kure family's possession for the past eighty-three years. By May 1, 2006, ten of the twenty-five had closed forever. Hurricanes caused the loss of some piers, but accelerated development on the barrier islands, especially Bogue Banks, is the main reason for closing piers. The price of beachfront property is soaring, and pier owners are selling to the developers. Soon the state's fishing piers and the culture they engendered will be gone forever.
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Record #:
8234
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Commercial fishermen in the state face an increasingly difficult life. They deal with intense state and federal regulations, while facing stiff competition from foreign imports. Fish houses are disappearing, leaving fewer places to sell catches. Boats slips are losing out to developments. A new factor is the tension that exists between commercial fisherman and recreational anglers. Wilson discusses reasons for this tension and what can be done about it.
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Record #:
8555
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Along the North Carolina coast a hostile relationship exists between recreational and commercial fishermen. Each group for their own reasons fears the other and what they might do. Leutze discusses some of the perceptions the two groups have of each other. For example, commercial fishermen feel recreational ones are insufficiently regulated, while they have to deal with all kinds of rules, regulations, and quotas. Recreational fishermen think that commercial people are unconcerned about exploiting the fisheries. Leutze suggests airing these perceptions to reach a middle ground. For example, commercial fishermen do care about the fisheries because their livelihood depends on them.
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Record #:
9834
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Carter describes fishing for chain pickerel in the Waccamaw River.
Record #:
10150
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Wilson discusses catch-and-release fishing in North Carolina. The program came to the state in 1954 on trout streams in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park. The program is an approach to having more fish available to catch and emphasizes the recreational rather than the consumptive value of fish.
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Record #:
11877
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A hardy race of North Carolinians, the Guthrey, Moore, Willis, and Rose families carved a living from Shackelford Banks, scavenging the shores, harvesting oysters and clams, and whale fishing. The historical account is narrated by Stacey Guthrey, daughter of whale-boat builder Devin Guthrey.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 4, July 1961, p9, 27, il
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Record #:
12685
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For fifty years, pilot and Rev. L. D. Hayman has kept both his pilot and ministry licenses. Possibly the only ordained minister in North Carolina who also runs a professional sport-fishing guide business, Hayman recently put his fishing cruiser up for sale. Although no longer a professional, Hayman will continue to keep his pilot license up, and enjoys fishing for mullet recreationally.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 8, Sept 1961, p9, por
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