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8 results for Weather
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Record #:
15496
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Abstract:
The heaviest snowfalls registered by the United States Weather Bureau at Raleigh occurred in 1899 and 1927. In both instances the snow was eighteen inches deep. In 1899, the snow storm occurred on February 13th and 14th, the temperature dropping to two degrees below zero. The highest temperature ever recorded at Raleigh was during July 1887 and August 1932, each occasion reaching 103 degrees.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 38, Feb 1936, p5, 22, f
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Record #:
16513
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BLUM's FARMER'S AND PLANTER'S ALMANAC, founded in 1828 by John Christian Blum includes a large portion of weather signs and lore.
Record #:
22512
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Tim Owen, chief of staff for the National Climatic Data Center in Asheville, is a graduate of UNC-Asheville and Penn State. His interest in meteorology extends back to a childhood winter and a thermometer; Owen's passion for weather supports the National Weather Service and records weather data from all over the country.
Record #:
164
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Experienced salt-water fishermen know weather often determines whether or not the fishing trip is successful.
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Record #:
34821
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The author is both a gardener and Civil War reenactor who participates in the reenactment of the Battle of Manassas, fought in 1861. During the 2006 reenactment, weather conditions at the battlefield mimicked those 145 years earlier; the temperature was recorded at 107 degrees Fahrenheit. Historically, Union forces retreated the morning of the final battle and Confederate soldiers did not pursue. The reenactment followed suite, however the reenactors finally understood the impact heat had on the battle—Confederate forces had neither the energy nor the enthusiasm to follow their enemy. Pierce further discusses the impact that weather has had on the energy and efforts of those living in southern states.
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Record #:
35163
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Abstract:
In 1841, it appeared to rain blood, which was later found out to be part of a large amount of butterflies shedding their pupa. However, this did not stop more extreme explanations from coming forth.
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Record #:
36974
Abstract:
Joos study on vernacular architecture of shotgun houses is influenced by history, sociology, and domesticity; he approaches the subjects in a multidisciplinary way. He uses ethnography, engineering, geography, and folklore to understand the needs and desires of the community after natural disasters.