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21 results for Sea turtles
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Record #:
3208
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Sea turtle strandings along the coast increased from 277 in 1990 to 503 in 1996. Scientists have yet to find a definitive answer for this. Theories range from natural occurrences to human impact on the environment.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Mar/Apr 1997, p16-22, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4920
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The North Carolina Sea Turtle Protection Program, which is run by the Wildlife Resources Commission, seeks to protect sea turtle nests and hatchlings and to collect mortality data. Comer describes how the Holden Beach Sea Turtle Watch caries out this mission and how stranded, sick, and injured sea turtles are handled.
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Record #:
4980
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In 2000, 839 sea turtles stranded along the North Carolina coast, the highest number ever reported. Encounters with boats caused some deaths; net fragments attached to some shells suggested possible entrapment in commercial fishing nets for others. However, causes for 91 percent of the deaths could not be determined.
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Record #:
8795
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The National Marine Fisheries Service permanently closed Pamlico Sound's deep-water area to large gill net commercial fishing from September to mid-December 2002. The closing was because of sea turtle strandings and their interaction with gill nets. The closing was also detrimental to Hyde County fishermen. A North Carolina Fishery Resource Grant study examines Hyde County fishermen's use of experimental nets that are designed to produce a good flounder catch but avoid or reduce sea turtle entanglements.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2007, p16-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
10602
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In years past, coastal Carolinians enjoyed traditional sea turtle egg hunts on the full moon in June. The full moon would illuminate tracks left on the beach by female turtles returning to the water after laying their eggs. Egg hunts were primarily social events carried out by groups competing to find the most eggs, which would be used as an ingredient in old-fashioned corn bread. Ocean front development and protective laws have combined to render the once eagerly anticipated event a distant memory.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 38 Issue 2, June 1970, p8-10, il
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Record #:
21011
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Sea turtles, especially the most common one--the loggerhead--that live along the state's coast are becoming threatened and in need of help by mankind. This presents an ironic situation because humans, the only group with the skills to help turtle survive, are also the group that inflicts the most harm to them. For example, plastic bottle strips tossed into the ocean where turtle get entangled or eat them and large gill nets used by fishermen all are threats to the turtles.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 14 Issue 3, Fall/Win 2006, p6-8, il
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Record #:
24052
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Southern flounder fishermen use specialized nets called gill nets to catch fish, but endangered sea turtle species often get caught in these nets. In the recent past, the government threatened to close estuarine gill net fisheries. However, a series of agencies work with the national Marine Fisheries to ensure that these gill net fisheries stay open and that endangered species are protected.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 4, Autumn 2015, p14-17, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
25009
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Tracking the movements of sea turtles can be difficult. It is especially difficult to track male turtles because once they hatch and go to the ocean; they don’t come back onto land. There is some known information on female sea turtles though and from that scientists hope to learn more.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, May 1981, p1-2, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25012
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Sea turtles get caught in fishermen’s nets all the time. However, a new device is being designed to fit onto a fisherman’s net that will sort out any heavy objects, such as a sea turtle, and push it through a trap door in the bottom of the net. This is expected to save many turtles from being trapped and killed by the nets.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, May 1981, p5-6, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25011
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Sea turtles are in trouble. The leading factor is development of beaches. With off road vehicle tracks, and human foot prints, baby turtles get stuck and eventually eaten. Other factors affecting their journey to the ocean are street lights, raccoons, and foxes.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, May 1981, p3-4, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25010
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The ritual of a mother sea turtle has been described as almost magical. From the lumbering out of the sea to the digging of the nest, the mother turtle dutifully does her task until the eggs are lain and the nest is hidden.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, May 1981, p2-3, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25013
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Many a story has been passed down about sea turtles. From the Hindu tale of the turtle with the world on its back, to the myth that sea turtle eggs are an aphrodisiac all are tall tales.
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Record #:
25124
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Graduate student Kimberly Hernandez explains how her research on shoreline preservation may help keep the sea turtle populations up and make them more balanced in the sex produced by the sand.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2014, p32-33, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
25985
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Three more species of sea turtle have been added to the US List of Threatened Species. The green, loggerhead, and Pacific ridley sea turtles face risks from coastal development and shoreline change along many parts of the country, including North Carolina.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 3, Summer 1975, p13
Record #:
26493
Author(s):
Abstract:
Protecting sea turtle eggs and hatchlings alone are not enough to save sea turtle populations. Dr. Larry Crowder, a zoologist at North Carolina State University, says we need more emphasis on large juvenile and adult turtles caught by commercial fishermen.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 38 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1991, p6, il
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