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6 results for Reptiles--North Carolina
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Record #:
25009
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tracking the movements of sea turtles can be difficult. It is especially difficult to track male turtles because once they hatch and go to the ocean; they don’t come back onto land. There is some known information on female sea turtles though and from that scientists hope to learn more.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, May 1981, p1-2, il Periodical Website
Record #:
25010
Author(s):
Abstract:
The ritual of a mother sea turtle has been described as almost magical. From the lumbering out of the sea to the digging of the nest, the mother turtle dutifully does her task until the eggs are lain and the nest is hidden.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 8 Issue 5, May 1981, p2-3, il Periodical Website
Record #:
19266
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is home to the most biodiversity of any temperate region in the world. This includes 70 native reptile species such as turtles, lizards, snakes, and crocodiles, ranging terrestrial, aquatic, marine, arboreal, and fossorial species.
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Record #:
22595
Author(s):
Abstract:
Alvin Braswell has retired after over forty years as curator of herpetology of the North Carolina Museum of Natural Sciences. Beginning his career in 1968, Braswell has mentored students and published comprehensive volumes on the reptiles and amphibians of North Carolina.
Source:
North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Winter 2015, p2-3, por
Record #:
28587
Author(s):
Abstract:
Reptiles and amphibians don’t wander aimlessly. They know where they are, what they are doing, and everything else about their home range. Home ranges for reptiles and amphibians, their homes, territories, and behaviors are detailed.
Record #:
30086
Abstract:
Fourteen species of reptiles were found in a year-long study of lower Wilson Creek, Caldwell County, North Carolina. Several of these species represented significant range extensions. A combination of exposed rock for basking, deep fissures, and warmer night and winter temperatures is probably responsible for the continued presence of these species well outside their known ranges.
Source:
Brimleyana (NoCar QL 155 B75), Vol. Issue 9, June 1983, p21-32, il, bibl Periodical Website
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