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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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69 results for Wildlife conservation
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Record #:
1334
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Abstract:
Private citizens in North Carolina are participating in a grassroots movement to set aside areas in land trusts that will preserve wildlife habitats and relieve pressure on government to purchase such lands.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 58 Issue 3, Winter 1993, p3-10, il
Record #:
1937
Author(s):
Abstract:
Instituting a new definition of \"critical habitat\" for freshwater fish and mussels may be North Carolina's most important conservation battle of the year. The new definition would require a conservation plan for 25 streams where the species live.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 1994, p6-7, il
Record #:
2396
Author(s):
Abstract:
Critics of the Endangered Species Act contend that animal rights take priority over those of landowners. Three state landowners whose property provides a habitat for three different species show that profit can be realized and wildlife also protected.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 43 Issue 2, Summer 1995, p2-5, il
Record #:
2659
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1989 and 1995, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission transplanted otters to the state's western waterways. For the first time since the 1930s, otters are living again in eleven of the state's western watersheds.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 8, Jan 1996, p4-5, il
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Record #:
3778
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Abstract:
Funding to conserve nongame species, including songbirds and reptiles, is declining. Teaming with Wildlife, a national funding initiative, is a possible solution. If politicians agree, a small tax would be placed on outdoor equipment. This would earn $8 million for the state alone.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Spring 1998, p2-5, il
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Record #:
3919
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Abstract:
Wildlife and Industry Together, or WAIT, is an innovative program that brings industry, state and local conservation groups together to create wildlife habitats on industrial and commercial lands. The program benefits are many, including increasing employee environmental awareness and reducing land maintenance costs.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 45 Issue 4, Fall 1998, p10-11, il
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Record #:
4143
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Wildlife and Industry Together (W.A.I.T.) program, run by the N.C. Wildlife Federation Endowment and Education Fund, brings together state and local conservation groups and industry to accomplish two goals: creating wildlife habitats on commercial and industrial lands and educating people about wildlife occupying these habitats. The state's first W.A.I.T. program was started by the Kemet Electronics plant in Shelby in 1997.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 46 Issue 2, Spring 1999, p8-9, il
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Record #:
4629
Author(s):
Abstract:
Some of the state's declining species, including black bear, deer, wild turkey, and bald eagle, made remarkable recoveries during the 20th-century. The challenge of the 21st-century will be to protect and conserve wildlife in a time when population, urban sprawl, and intolerance for wildlife are increasing.
Record #:
4670
Author(s):
Abstract:
The timber rattlesnake is an important part of the forest ecosystem. Loss of habitat through development reduces its numbers. The snake also has an undeserved reputation as a creature to be feared. People encountering it often kill it, when all the snake wants is to avoid people. Herpetologist John Sealy discusses positive values of the rattlesnake and why it should be protected.
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Record #:
4720
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Abstract:
Demand for raw materials for global wood and paper markets, urban sprawl, and need for recreational outlets are changing North Carolina's forests and affecting wildlife populations. Manuel lists three trends in modern forestry and discusses their effect on wildlife: modular chip mills; replacing natural forests with pine plantations; and logging in publicly owned national forests.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 48 Issue 2, Summer 2000, p2-7, il
Record #:
4920
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Abstract:
The North Carolina Sea Turtle Protection Program, which is run by the Wildlife Resources Commission, seeks to protect sea turtle nests and hatchlings and to collect mortality data. Comer describes how the Holden Beach Sea Turtle Watch caries out this mission and how stranded, sick, and injured sea turtles are handled.
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Record #:
4928
Author(s):
Abstract:
Few people in North Carolina in 2001 recognize the name Ross Stevens. Yet this pioneering wildlife biologist and co-founder and first executive secretary of the North Carolina Wildlife Federation changed forever the face of conservation in the state. Vaughn chronicles Stevens' life and contributions to conservation.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 49 Issue 1, Winter 2001, p2-5, il, por
Record #:
4980
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 2000, 839 sea turtles stranded along the North Carolina coast, the highest number ever reported. Encounters with boats caused some deaths; net fragments attached to some shells suggested possible entrapment in commercial fishing nets for others. However, causes for 91 percent of the deaths could not be determined.
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Record #:
5049
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Wildlife and Industry Together (W.A.I.T.) program, run by the North Carolina Wildlife Federation Endowment and Education Fund, brings together state and local conservation groups and industry to accomplish two goals: create wildlife habitats on commercial and industrial lands and provide education to the public about wildlife occupying these habitats. Gestwicki discusses program mechanics, from site analysis to implementation of the plan, and looks at partners at current W.A.I.T. sites, such as Duke Power's McGuire Nuclear Station.
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Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 48 Issue 2, Spring 2001, p10-11, il
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Record #:
5257
Abstract:
Two Vulcan Materials quarry sites, Cabarrus County and Clear Creek, have been recognized by the North Carolina Wildlife Federation for their participation in the Wildlife and Industry Together (W.A.I.T.) program. The Vulcan quarries agreed, as part of the program \"to manage a portion of their property for wildlife habitats.\" These are the first quarries to be W.A.I.T. certified in North Carolina.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 50 Issue 2, Summer 2002, p6, il
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