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7 results for Wildlife reintroduction
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Record #:
2659
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1989 and 1995, the North Carolina Wildlife Commission transplanted otters to the state's western waterways. For the first time since the 1930s, otters are living again in eleven of the state's western watersheds.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 8, Jan 1996, p4-5, il
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Record #:
2883
Author(s):
Abstract:
The red wolf has been reintroduced in the state through the Red Wolf Recovery Program. The world's largest free-roaming red wolf population, about sixty, now lives on 500,000 acres in the eastern part of the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 12, May 1996, p4-5
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Record #:
4453
Abstract:
Twenty years ago, there were 14 red wolves left in the nation. Through wildlife management, this endangered animal was brought back. In 1987, red wolves were successfully released into the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in eastern North Carolina. Now, with the spread of coyotes across the state, interbreeding, which almost destroyed the red wolf's genetic purity once before, threatens it again.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p22-24, il Periodical Website
Record #:
6970
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is slowly restoring animals that were largely or entirely extirpated during the last century. Reintroductions include the otter, beaver, elk, wild turkey, and red wolf. The Horizon 2100 plan calls for the reintroduction of the Eastern cougar. This animal is what is called an “apex predator,” or an animal that sits at the top of the food chain. Manuel discusses whether large predators should be brought back into North Carolina and whether they can possibly coexist with people in the twenty-first century.
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Record #:
7342
Author(s):
Abstract:
River otters are known for their antics, whether performing in the wild or in an aquarium. This animal can grow to around three or four feet and weigh more than forty pounds. It can live up to fifteen years in the wild and sometimes longer in captivity. However, back in the 1800s and early 1900s, the river otter had all but vanished from the North Carolina landscape. Uncontrolled trapping, water pollution, and habitat destruction contributed to its demise. In the 1970s the state began an otter reintroduction program. Today the otter has been successfully restored throughout the state.
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Record #:
9799
Author(s):
Abstract:
More peregrine falcons and bald eagles have been released in the state's reintroduction program which began in 1984. Ten peregrines were released from two sites--six from Grandfather Mountain and four from Yellow Mountain in the Nantahala National Forest. Ten bald eagles were released at the Lake Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge in Hyde County.
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Record #:
2384
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission completed its river otter restoration project in the spring of 1995. For the first time since the 1930s, river otters, moved from eastern counties, are again in eleven of the state's western watersheds.
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