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11 results for Red wolf
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Record #:
1400
Author(s):
Abstract:
By the 1970s, the red wolf faced extinction. Six years after a groundbreaking experiment to save the red wolf began in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, the shy, nocturnal wolf has a chance of survival.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1993, p8-11, il Periodical Website
Record #:
1861
Author(s):
Abstract:
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service's Red Wolf Recovery program, an effort to reintroduce red wolves into their native habitats, is meeting with firm resistance from Hyde County residents who view the wolves as a threat to property and livestock.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 42 Issue 3, Summer 1994, p2-6, il
Record #:
2883
Author(s):
Abstract:
The red wolf has been reintroduced in the state through the Red Wolf Recovery Program. The world's largest free-roaming red wolf population, about sixty, now lives on 500,000 acres in the eastern part of the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 12, May 1996, p4-5
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Record #:
4453
Abstract:
Twenty years ago, there were 14 red wolves left in the nation. Through wildlife management, this endangered animal was brought back. In 1987, red wolves were successfully released into the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in eastern North Carolina. Now, with the spread of coyotes across the state, interbreeding, which almost destroyed the red wolf's genetic purity once before, threatens it again.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p22-24, il Periodical Website
Record #:
8130
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1980, the red wolf was declared extinct in the wild. Breeding programs conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have brought the animal back. There are thirty-eight places in the United States that conduct captive breeding programs, but the only place in the world where red wolves roam in the wild is in eastern North Carolina on the 1.7-million acre Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. Daniel discusses the Red Wolf Howling Safari, a two-hour program conducted on Wednesday nights in the summer and on special nights the rest of the year. The wolves are never seen, but sometimes they will howl back at their human imitators.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p198-200, 202, 204, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
24099
Author(s):
Abstract:
Four red wolf puppies were born at the Nature Center and are expected to thrive and bolster red wolf populations in the nation. The Species Survival Plan saved the red wolf from extinction after only 14 pure wolves remained in the entire world.
Record #:
718
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a result of a restoration project by the US Fish and Wildlife Service at the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, red wolves, an important part of North Carolina's wildlife heritage, are reappearing.
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Record #:
9924
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1980, the red wolf was declared to be extinct. However, in 1987, red wolves were relocated to the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in eastern North Carolina. The following spring, two pairs of free-ranging wolves produced litters. The pups were the first red wolves born outside a zoo in years.
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Record #:
7870
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The last red wolf sighting in the North Carolina Mountains was in the 1930s. Two mated pairs of red wolves, sent to the Great Smoky Mountains this winter, will be released into the wild in August as part of a reintroduction project. The animals will be held in an acclimation pen, and it is hoped they will breed and produce pups by the spring. Before release, the adult wolves will be fitted with radio collars, and the pups, if any, will be implanted with internal radio transmitters for tracking their movements.
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Record #:
27269
Author(s):
Abstract:
There are only about forty red wolves left in the eastern North Carolina wilderness. In the coming weeks, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service rules on the future of the Red Wolf Recovery Program.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 35, August 2016, p8, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
38281
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Abstract:
The county seat of Tyrrell County is also the only town in the county, which was founded in 1793. It’s also defined as one is its identity as a singular town—one doctor, one lawyer, one pharmacy, one road. How it’s defined as two: Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds forming the second largest estuary in the country; two animals, the red wolf and red cockaded woodpecker, being protected species.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p46-50, 52, 54, 56-58, 60, 62, 64-65 Periodical Website