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10 results for Coyotes
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Record #:
1388
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Coyotes, first documented by wildlife officials in North Carolina in 1983, have spread throughout the state. Intelligent and adaptable, they are here to stay.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 9, Feb 1994, p22-24, il
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Record #:
3928
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The coyote's range is expanding. In the early 1980s, the animal was found in only four of the state's one hundred counties. By 1998, it had almost covered the state. Impacts from such proliferation include increased human-animal encounters and threats to native wildlife.
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Record #:
4453
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Twenty years ago, there were 14 red wolves left in the nation. Through wildlife management, this endangered animal was brought back. In 1987, red wolves were successfully released into the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge in eastern North Carolina. Now, with the spread of coyotes across the state, interbreeding, which almost destroyed the red wolf's genetic purity once before, threatens it again.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2000, p22-24, il Periodical Website
Record #:
7514
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Coyotes are secretive and very wary animals that are active at dawn and dusk. Although they live in the state's one hundred counties, coyote sightings have been rare, but that is changing. Both coyote and human populations are increasing in North Carolina. Webber discusses the negative image the animals have, especially among rural residents, farmers, ranchers, and hunters, and ways to improve relations between the two groups.
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Record #:
9939
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Mention coyote and images of the West appear in the mind; however, within the past decade this pest from the West has arrived in North Carolina. There have been sightings in Jones, Craven, and Beaufort Counties, but the first evidence that the animals are breeding was discovered when some coyote pups were found on a Jones County farm.
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Record #:
21064
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Kays explains why coyotes run the gamut of emotions in people--some people love them and others just can't stand them.
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North Carolina Naturalist (NoCar QH 76.5 N8 N68), Vol. 20 Issue 3, Fall 2012, p2-3, il
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Record #:
26403
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Toxic collars have been developed to prevent coyotes from killing sheep. The collars are worn by sheep, and when bitten by coyotes, release a toxic chemical that kills the coyote.
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Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 23 Issue (26) 4, Oct 1979, p2
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Record #:
6401
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Mention the word coyote, and individuals first think of the Old West. However, this animal is spreading across the country and has reached North Carolina. The population is still quite small, but it is expected to grow. Coyotes prey on rats and mice, but also feed on deer, rabbits, and even livestock. Environmentalists are concerned that the coyote will have an adverse effect on the newly started red wolf release program in the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.
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Record #:
30622
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In 2011, a study conducted by North Carolina State University found that some coyotes captured and fitted with tracking collars roamed four-hundred miles or more. This article presents results of the study and discusses the history and control of coyotes in North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 3, Mar 2016, p28-29, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31318
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The author recounts her own encounter with a coyote before continuing on with this piece about coexisting with one of North Carolina’s growing populations of natural predators. It is now confirmed that coyote populations are present in all 100 counties in North Carolina
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