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13 results for Albemarle Sound
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Record #:
1120
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study (APES) is an intensive analysis of the Albemarle and Pamlico sounds with the goal of finding ways to manage these estuaries to conserve their valuable ecological functions.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Sept/Oct 1992, p8-10, por
Record #:
23290
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Chowan River begins in Franklin, VA and is one of the major freshwater contributors to the Albemarle Sound.
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Record #:
24445
Abstract:
Shad fishing once boomed along the Albemarle Sound, but only a few locals remember that time or what the boats looked like. This article recounts the significance of this industry in Albemarle County and how it has changed over time.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 10, March 1991, p32-34, il
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Record #:
24659
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article serves as a guide for tourists who wish to travel to the Northeast coastal region in North Carolina and focuses on cities such as Kill Devil Hills, the Outer Banks, and the Albemarle Sound.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 2, June 1957, p33-37, il
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Record #:
731
Author(s):
Abstract:
Serious trouble stalks two of the nation's largest estuarine areas, threatening the state's eastern economy and environment. Our best hope for restoration may lie with the five-year Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study.
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Record #:
941
Author(s):
Abstract:
A management plan released by the Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study would restore the sickly Pamlico and Albemarle sounds.
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Record #:
22484
Author(s):
Abstract:
Edenton, also known during the Revolutionary War as the Port of Roanoke, was an important port city, and was thus a British target during the conflict. One such predator on the Albemarle Sound was the British row galley, GENERAL ARNOLD. Attacks on boats and encounters with GENERAL ARNOLD forced many to flee across the Sound to Windsor. However, the citizens of Edenton banded together to meet GENERAL ARNOLD head-on.
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Record #:
33472
Author(s):
Abstract:
A five-year study designed to reverse the trend of increasing pollution and declining fisheries in the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds is now entering its initial research phase. The Albemarle-Pamlico Estuarine Study is being conducted by the Environmental Protection Agency’s National Estuarine Program and the North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development. Research will identify causes of pollution problems and implications to management strategies.
Record #:
35623
Author(s):
Abstract:
The journey took the author and her husband through major and minor waterways along the Coast toward their New Jersey destination. What the eventful October adventure proved: home can be aboard a small ship or ashore in the house she was glad to return to.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 5 Issue 5, Oct 1977, p12-15
Record #:
35750
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author’s discussion of NC lakes reflected their importance as a source of recreation such as fishing and swimming, as well as backdrops for camping and picnicking. Examples were size (the Kerr Reservoir, fifty thousand acres), type (natural lakes are only in the Coastal Plain), and depth (Mattamuskeet, its greatest depth five feet). Discussed also were eastern lakes’ three groupings (peninsula between Pamlico River and Albemarle Sound; Pocosin slough between New Bern and Bogue Sound; in Columbus and Bladen county).
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p23-24
Record #:
35809
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted first were reasons to appreciate the Coast and its waters, particularly sites that lend appeal. Land marks ranged from the well-known Outer Banks to perhaps lesser known Bird’s Island. Towns included famed Kittyhawk to the famed by relatively few Duck. As for what he saw as evidence of being taken for granted: pollution of air and water, destruction to dunes and wildlife. Out of an enduring appreciation for, and mounting concern about, he called for all North Carolinians to restore the Coast and its waters for future generations and out of a sacred duty.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p40-42, 56-60
Record #:
38298
Author(s):
Abstract:
Called sound country by the author, North Carolina attained this status by having more sounds than any other state in the east. Its importance may be better defined, however, by the role that sounds like Currituck have played in defining a way of life for Eastern North Carolinians and the region’s seafood industry for centuries.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 4, Sept 2011, p96-98, 100, 102-104, 106, 108, 110, 112, 114 Periodical Website
Record #:
38281
Author(s):
Abstract:
The county seat of Tyrrell County is also the only town in the county, which was founded in 1793. It’s also defined as one is its identity as a singular town—one doctor, one lawyer, one pharmacy, one road. How it’s defined as two: Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds forming the second largest estuary in the country; two animals, the red wolf and red cockaded woodpecker, being protected species.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 6, Nov 2012, p46-50, 52, 54, 56-58, 60, 62, 64-65 Periodical Website