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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Crabbing
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Record #:
545
Abstract:
Blue crabs and the blue crab industry are defining aspects of North Carolina.
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Record #:
546
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Burgess describes the molting process of soft shell crabs and discusses North Carolina's crab industry.
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Record #:
8985
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In autumn, fishing on the North Carolina coast is bountiful. However, when the fish are not biting, shellfish can be found in any coastal water area that is not polluted. Clams can be raked during low tide in creek beds, along the banks, and on old sandbars. Crabs can be baited using nets and fish heads. Oysters are found in clusters on the edges of marshes and along creeks at low tide. It is necessary, however, to check local laws which define sizes and quantities of shellfish that can be removed from these areas.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 48 Issue 4, Sept 1980, p19-20, il
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Record #:
13094
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Although the crabbing industry in North Carolina is one of the youngest of the State's four major commercial fishing industries, it has shown the most progress in the past 20 years. Three-fourths of the annual catch comes from Pamlico Sound and its major tributaries. There are three principal methods of crabbing in North Carolina: crab pots, trawling nets, and \"trot lines.\"
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 10, Oct 1955, p12, f
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Record #:
24523
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The author recounts his experiences catching live blue crabs on the coast of North Carolina as a child. Today, the overall blue crab populations have been depleted as a result of overfishing, pesticides in the water, parasites, and disease.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 45 Issue 3, August 1977, p21-22, il
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Record #:
25201
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Children used to frequent the docks on the Pamlico River in the fifties. Linda Boyer recounts her memories of this experience.
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Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 12 Issue 4, Summer 1993, p4
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Record #:
428
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The crabbing industry in North Carolina is expanding annually. Blue crab stocks are abundant, and the industry has experienced virtually no obstacles to its growth.
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Record #:
28792
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Last year, more than 4,3000 lost or abandoned crab pots were removed from state waters. The crab pots pose many problems to wildlife and humans. The problem and the task of recovering the pots is detailed.
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Record #:
36004
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Old time crabbing meant trot lines instead of wire pots, and income of three cents a pound versus the contemporary rate of twelve. From Edward Scarborough’s observations about facts like these, one ironic conclusion could be drawn. A better living could be made in the midst of the Great Depression than forty years later.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p18-21