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9 results for Hatteras Inlet--History
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Record #:
3138
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hatteras Inlet is distinguished from other coastal inlets in that it has had two locations during its history. The first, depicted on a 1738 chart, was not shown in 1764. The second was created in 1846 by a storm.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 6, Oct 1996, p10-15, il, f
Record #:
13960
Author(s):
Abstract:
Though Cape Hatteras is well known for its many shipwrecks and other disasters, few are familiar with the Battle of Hatteras Inlet Batteries in 1861, one of the most important early naval engagements of the Civil War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 22, Oct 1950, p5, 20, il
Full Text:
Record #:
35943
Abstract:
The life of Archie Scarborough included a skill for square knot making. Much of the interview pivoted around this talent, what he also called macramé making. Traveling the conversation path included life landmarks such as contenting with the Park Service and helping to construct Wimble Shoals Lighthouse and a railroad in Kitty Hawk.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p48-53
Record #:
35954
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remembrance of rescue from a Coast Guard boat overtaken by a hurricane was spurred by the death of Lt. Bernice Ramon Ballance. He, as much as the event, was a reminder that heroes, found during war and peace, can be located on a rescuing sea plane as much as capsized cutter. For more information about this event, refer to the book, North Carolina Hurricanes, by Charles B. Carney and Albert V. Hardy.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p59-64
Record #:
35952
Abstract:
Remnants of the ship, sunk between Hatteras Island and Ocracoke in 1913, were reputedly left along the coast. Pieces of the wreckage could also be perceived in its survivors and those left behind, like Mrs. Martha Barnett, to tell the tale.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p57
Record #:
35953
Author(s):
Abstract:
Accompaniment to the Martha Barnett Austin’s “Shipwreck! The George W. Wells” was this article, whose information about the sunken schooner was referenced from David Stick’s Graveyard of the Atlantic.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p58
Record #:
35992
Abstract:
A true down homer was about more than just being born in a local town or having one’s name affiliated with a local building. What made Charlie Gray Sr. so included turning down job offers after graduation from North Carolina State College, so he could own a local grocery store. Being a down homer was also reflected in his promotion of education for the area. During his almost fifty year career as a school principal and teacher, he professed a hope for Hatteras Island to have a central accredited high school.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p72-77
Record #:
36014
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of personal interest to the author were also items of historical interest. Up close and personal was the view that he offered of sunken ships, as well as the marine life that lived around them. As visual illustration was a map locating the wrecked watercrafts, which included a German submarine. Accompanying the map was a brief description of each: an old boiler, LST#741, Richmond, Kyzickes, Zane Gray, U-85, and York.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p10-13, map
Record #:
36015
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between the Coast Guard, naval yard, and commercial fisheries work of many kinds, Mr. Robert Watson Gray had gained almost a lifetime of maritime experience. After retirement, with much of his days taken up by fishing, he showed how the lure of the open sea still reeled him in.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p52-59