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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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8 results for Kitty Hawk
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Record #:
24555
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article recounts the Wright brothers’ twelve seconds of first flight in Kitty Hawk, North Carolina in December 1903.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 7, December 1973, p19-20
Full Text:
Record #:
25380
Author(s):
Abstract:
ECU artists Hanna Jubran and Jodi Hollnagel are working on a monument for the Aycock Brown Welcome Center in Kitty Hawk. The monument has been sponsored by many corporations features 14 stainless steel pylons.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35756
Abstract:
The author provided a Dare County guide with information about the county celebrating its quadricentennial. Cited were the Lost Colony’s history and historic landmarks like Kittyhawk. Described were must see sites like Cape Hatteras, must do recreation like hang gliding off of Jockey’s Ridge; and must visit towns like Southern Shores. As pictorial accompaniment was a hand drawn map of Manteo depicting its historical homes like the Meekins house, businesses like The Old Bank Building, and event sites like the Battle of Burnside.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p30A-30T
Record #:
35809
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted first were reasons to appreciate the Coast and its waters, particularly sites that lend appeal. Land marks ranged from the well-known Outer Banks to perhaps lesser known Bird’s Island. Towns included famed Kittyhawk to the famed by relatively few Duck. As for what he saw as evidence of being taken for granted: pollution of air and water, destruction to dunes and wildlife. Out of an enduring appreciation for, and mounting concern about, he called for all North Carolinians to restore the Coast and its waters for future generations and out of a sacred duty.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1979, p40-42, 56-60
Record #:
35730
Author(s):
Abstract:
As the author proposed, the coast contained a treasure trove of treats to sate the interest palate of any visitor. History buffs could have their fill in towns such as New Bern, Memorials such as Kittyhawk and houses such as Tryon Palace. For lovers of the great outdoors, there were the Elizabethan Gardens, Jockey’s Ridge, and Merchants Millpond State Park.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 3, May/June 1979, p57
Record #:
35945
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Sea Chest staff continued the Weather Station’s briny borne adventures in these entries, chronicled between March-June 1876. Wedged between the ordinary reports of barometric pressure was the extraordinary three week disappearance of Private Hanes. To illustrate the difference between charting the weather during the 19th century and current methods, included were pictures of modern weather forecasting equipment.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p64-70
Record #:
36014
Author(s):
Abstract:
Of personal interest to the author were also items of historical interest. Up close and personal was the view that he offered of sunken ships, as well as the marine life that lived around them. As visual illustration was a map locating the wrecked watercrafts, which included a German submarine. Accompanying the map was a brief description of each: an old boiler, LST#741, Richmond, Kyzickes, Zane Gray, U-85, and York.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 1, Spring/Summer 1980, p10-13, map
Record #:
38115
Abstract:
A renowned Eastern North Carolina artist extended his passion for coastal living and people beyond the canvas. Frank Stick can be credited for starting Southern Shores and an architectural style that is part of the town’s identity. Stick's Flat Top cottages, with features such as concrete block walls and solid shutters, could withstand certain weather conditions and extended unoccupancy. His efforts to maintain the lives within those walls extended to overseeing financing and assisting with keeping cottages during owners’ challenging financial times. Today, the community extends its appreciation through preservation efforts such as historic landmark designation and the Outer Banks Community Foundation.