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42 results for Roanoke Colony
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Record #:
1585
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East Carolina University's Institute for Historical and Cultural Research has added a new branch, the Roanoke Colonies Research Office, which will study a variety of subjects connected with the first attempted English settlement in the New World.
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Record #:
4343
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No one knows why the Roanoke Island colonists mysteriously disappeared. A number of theories abound as to the fate of the Lost Colony, including destruction from a hurricane; drought in the early stages of the colony as evidenced by a study of tree rings; massacre by hostile Native Americans; and attack from the Spanish who were at war with England.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 6, Nov 1999, p122-124, 126-128, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
8158
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The mystery of the Lost Colony continues to fascinate historians. While there is still no evidence explaining the fate of the colony, new evidence has expanded our knowledge of the Roanoke Island colony. Park Ranger Phillip Evans argues that, while there is no evidence proving so, theories on the colony moving to the Chesapeake or to Croatoan Island have merit. Evans also discusses recent archeological findings that challenge previous notions on the village's structure. Excavations of colonial watchtowers in Wolstenholme, VA, match similar findings reached on Roanoke Island, suggesting that similar structures were built in both locations. Evans hopes that through further archeological studies, a greater understanding of the fate of the Roanoke Colony will be obtained.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 4, Sept 1984, p19-22, por
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Record #:
8561
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Meteorologist Marvin Hunter presents an argument that supposes the Lost Colony was eradicated by a hurricane-induced storm surge and not by Indians. When he returned to the colony in 1588, Governor John White assumed the colonists had moved to Croatan because of the infamous tree carving. However, bad weather prevented Governor White and his crew from going to Croatoan. Because White was so detailed in all of his descriptions, Hunter argues that White does not mention house remnants because they simply were not there. Further evidence of a hurricane is the inclement weather met by White and his crew.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 50 Issue 4, Sept 1982, p8-10, il, map
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Record #:
10668
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What happened to the English settlers on Roanoke Island in the late 16th-century is one of the nation's greatest mysteries. The 150 colonists--men, women, and children--disappeared without a trace. Centuries later the disappearance remains unsolved.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 2, June 1968, p10-12, 60, il
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Record #:
11498
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Fort Raleigh, along with other historic buildings associated with Walter Raleigh's colony on Roanoke Island, will be rebuilt, using the most precise records available. The $20,000 expenditure was approved by the State Administrator of Civil Works.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 34, Jan 1934, p25
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Record #:
14101
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David Stick has done considerable research work in connection with the disappearance of the colonists, and he presents his findings here.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 5, July 1949, p11, 20-21
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Record #:
14397
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Bond presents an interesting historical sketch of Mann's Harbor better known as Croatan, or, the 'Lost Colony,' following the failed settlement attempt. Other attempts were made to settle this area including, Captain Charlie Mann's early successful endeavor. The article describes the settlers of Captain Mann's expedition, their difficult lives in the new colonies, and the population of Mann's Harbor in 1949.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 51, May 1949, p5
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Record #:
15830
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The North Carolina Museum of History collaborated with the British Museum to present Mysteries of the Lost Colony and A New World: England's First View of America. The exhibit focused on early English expeditions to establish permanent settlements in America. John White's famous watercolors were the highlight of the exhibit.
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Record #:
15858
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Spanish documents describing the English colony of Roanoke supplement existing English records and offer a more diverse, \"international perspective\" on these early European settlements in America. The documents first appear in David Beers Quinn in The Roanoke Voyages, 1584-1590 but the author questions the accuracy of this translation and others in the literature.
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Record #:
16852
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On September 19, 1985 the Elizabeth II began a trip to both Beaufort and New Bern. The replica ship, built and launched in 1983, made the voyage from its homeport of Manteo to commemorate the four hundredth anniversary of the Roanoke voyages of 1584-1587.
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Record #:
17803
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The Citte of Raleigh became the first colony in America founded by the English in 1585. John White returned to the colony to find its settlers had vanished. Though mystery surrounds the lost settlers, modern historians and archaeologists are seeking physical remains of the colony. The author used a comparative cartographic approach to demonstrate site formation processes along the island and propose the Citte of Raleigh remains are now submerged.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 15, October 2008, p6-12, il
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Record #:
19190
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Few realize that Sir Walter Raleigh sponsored three voyages to North America--one for exploration and two for colonization--which all involved a small island today known as Roanoke. Hart examines the history of these voyages.
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Record #:
19208
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Many of the pieces are still missing 400 years later in the puzzle of the Roanoke Colony. Historians and archaeologists alike are still searching for the missing 117 men, women, and children.
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Record #:
20062
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This article examines the history of the Fort Raleigh site, the Roanoke Colony, also known as the \"Lost Colony\" and the establishment of the Fort Raleigh National Historic Site and Museum in 1940. Two glossy-print reprints of original John White maps are included in the article.
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