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25 results for Portsmouth Island--History
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Record #:
3137
Author(s):
Abstract:
Because of a need to provide medical care to seriously ill seamen on the Outer Banks, Congress authorized construction of the state's first hospital. It was built between 1846 and 1847 in the town of Portsmouth, on Portsmouth Island.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 6, Oct 1996, p6-9, il
Record #:
4233
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village of Portsmouth on North Core Banks, a once bustling fishing village, stands uninhabited since the last residents left in 1971. The village, founded in 1753, is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and contains twenty structures, including a post office, church, and several cemeteries. Around 700 people visit Portsmouth each month in warm weather.
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Record #:
4234
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jessie Lee Babb Dominique was born in Portsmouth on August 2, 1927. She was the last child born in the village, which at that time numbered around 100. She recounts her memories of island life, including the arrival of the mailboat. Her mother, sister Marian Gray Babb, and aunt Elma Dixon were the island's last residents. They left in 1971.
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Record #:
5837
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village of Portsmouth, located on North Core Banks, was founded in 1753 and was once a bustling fishing village. Today it is empty - a village of deserted buildings and no residents. White describes life in the village as it used to be.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 1 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1973, p12-15, 29, il
Record #:
7534
Author(s):
Abstract:
Steve Roberts was born on Portsmouth Island on October 1, 1901, and lived there until 1912, when his family moved to Morehead City. In this SEA CHEST interview, Roberts reminisces about his life on the island, including entertainment, home remedies, ponies, and the great freeze.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p22-27, por
Record #:
8592
Author(s):
Abstract:
Founded in 1753, the town of Portsmouth on the Outer Banks was a lively place of 505 people. Shipping was an important activity because inbound ships were stopped by the shallow waters and had to unload cargo at Portsmouth into smaller, shallow-draft vessels that could carry it across to the mainland. Activity in the town reached a peak in the mid-19th-century, afterward declined because of hurricanes, channels that filled with sand, and shipping activities falling off. By the early 1970s, the last residents had departed. All that remains of the town are 20 structures, including a post office, church, a schoolhouse, and several cemeteries.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 8 Issue 2, Feb 1976, p7-9, il, map Periodical Website
Record #:
15795
Author(s):
Abstract:
The last residents left Portsmouth Island long ago, and now a 1930s fishing village stands empty. Reachable only by boat, the island is preserved by the National Park Service as a reminder of the old days. for those who visit, the island holds a fascination of long ago coastal living.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 8, Jan 2012, p76-78, 80, 82-83, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
16233
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cecelski discusses a series of interviews done with former residents of Portsmouth Island, founded in 1754 and abandoned in 1971. Stories shed light on Outer Banks history and culture.
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Record #:
16242
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eason details the return of 400 people in Portsmouth Village, an island ghost town on the northernmost reach of Cape Lookout National Seashore. With a brief history of Portsmouth Island, Eason remarks on the current state of the area and attempts to bring this ghost town to life.
Record #:
19181
Author(s):
Abstract:
Portsmouth Village is quiet now, but its history tells the story of a once-bustling community established on trans-shipment. Today, its stands as part of National Register of Historic Places.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Feb 1984, p2-3, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
19710
Author(s):
Abstract:
A companion to the series \"Twelve North Carolina Counties in 1810-1811,\" the author provides a reprinting of several manuscripts taken from the Thomas Henderson Letter Book, 1810-1811. Included here is \"The Town of Beaufort,\" written by Jacob Henry in 1810, the unsigned manuscript, \"The Island of Portsmouth,\" \"Chatham County Mines and Quarries,\" written by M. McKenzie in 1811, \"Liberty Hall,\" by Adlai Laurens Osborn, \"Newton Academy,\" written by George Swain in 1810, and \"William Augustus Richards,\" by Archibald Debow Murphy.
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Record #:
25990
Author(s):
Abstract:
Portsmouth Island was established by the NC General Assembly in 1753. Once a thriving seaport along the Outer Banks, Portsmouth Island is now part of the National Park Service for recreational purposes. Although many of the buildings are in good condition, the Island is slowly disappearing into the sea.
Source:
Friend O’ Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 19 Issue 4, Sept-Oct 1975, p8-9, il
Record #:
9751
Author(s):
Abstract:
The village of Portsmouth, located on North Core Banks, was founded in 1753 and was once a bustling fishing village. Today it is empty - a village of deserted buildings and no residents, except for a few visiting fishermen and beachcombers.
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Record #:
28693
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rudy Austin and his family are Ocracoke Island natives who have made it possible for people to visit Portsmouth Island via boat for 40 years. Austin’s father once worked on the now uninhabited island and started taking visitors to the island when the National Park Service took over its management in the 1970s. The Austin’s are the only ferry service and as they age, many wonder what will happen to Portsmouth Island.
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Record #:
29889
Abstract:
Margaret Wallace was fascinated with Portsmouth Island, North Carolina from the time she set foot there, and has been living there since she was given a lease on the school house from the state. While the Park Service maintains the buildings, Wallace provides a historical tour of Portsmouth from the 1750s on.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 3, Spring 1978, p22-35, il, por, map