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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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39 results for Davis, Nancy
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Record #:
19168
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Although changes are when oil companies finally begin to drill for oil offshore of North Carolina's coast that the public will not even be aware, but that does not stop them from asking questions that concern the economic, social, and environmental health of the coast.
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Record #:
19167
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Davis discusses the state of oil drilling off the North Carolina coast as it stand now and how it has developed to this stage.
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19172
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Boiled skate, baked turtle, and roasted eel may make some squeamish now, but these recipes were popular in 18th-century North Carolina. Joyce Taylor, NC Sea Grant's marine advisory agent at the NCSU Seafood lab is studying colonial recipes of underutilized species like eel, while archaeologists examine Native American fishing camps to understand early seafood consumption.
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Record #:
19177
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Although often seeing success along the Atlantic coast, menhaden fisheries are now facing large fluctuations in fish populations and the potential of an industry collapse. Within this crisis, North Carolina is a key state, and management of its menhaden fisheries may prove the key preventing losses.
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Record #:
19174
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Many commercial fishermen in North Carolina are starting to see the value of soft-shell crabs. As soft-shell crab production in the state is increasing, prices per pound of soft-shell may more than double the price of hard-shell crabs.
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Record #:
19171
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With growing populations and harsh environmental conditions, many butt heads about what should be the fate of the wild horses on North Carolina's Shackleford Banks.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 10 Issue 5, May 1983, p8-9, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
19184
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NC Sea Grant researcher Jeffery Johnson, an anthropologist at East Carolina University, is studying social networks among North Carolina commercial fishermen and how knowledge and adoption of technology flows amongst this group.
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Record #:
19181
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Portsmouth Village is quiet now, but its history tells the story of a once-bustling community established on trans-shipment. Today, its stands as part of National Register of Historic Places.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 11 Issue 2, Feb 1984, p2-3, map, f Periodical Website
Record #:
19187
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Each year, thousands of water birds travel to Battery Island--a chuck of marsh rising out of the Cape Fear River across from Southport. During the summer this area becomes home to North Carolina's largest populations of white ibises, egrets, and heron. As such the state is leasing Battery Island to the Audubon Society as a sanctuary where it can be managed and studied as a refuge for water birds.
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Record #:
19189
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The tiny town of Manteo will undergo a transformation while it plays host for America's 400th anniversary and the commemoration of the Roanoke voyages sponsored by Sir Walter Raleigh.
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Record #:
19209
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Beneath the tilled farmland of North Carolina lies the secrets of a Native American civilization in the area long before the arrival of the British. With the help of modern archaeologists, researchers are finding clues to these Carolina Indian villages.
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Record #:
19210
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Davis discusses marketing the shark fishing industry in North Carolina, as it faces ups and downs within the domestic market.
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Record #:
19211
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Farmers have found that the wetlands that lie adjacent to coastal waters yield bountiful crops, but only if the water can be controlled.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. 11 Issue 8, Sept 1984, p3-4, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
19220
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The most desirable neighborhood for North Carolina fish may be a community founded on old tires, scrap concrete, and sunken ships. Artificial reefs are now being used by NC Division of Marine Fisheries to improve the habitat of coastal waters that can support more fish.
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Record #:
19219
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Today's recreational fishermen is a different breed who wants a bigger say in policy making decisions over species regulations and taxes. Some fishing programs are turning into federations of members who are fighting for recreational fishing rights.
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