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4 results for North Carolina--History, Colonial period, ca. 1600-1775--Foodways
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Record #:
16498
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Abstract:
Life may have been rough and crude in Carolina in the 1600s, but according to travelers who recorded their findings and inhabitants who wrote of their way of life in the newly-found country, good food and an abundance of it were not lacking. Ingenuity and hard work were essential in producing, finding, or cooking the products.
Record #:
19172
Author(s):
Abstract:
Boiled skate, baked turtle, and roasted eel may make some squeamish now, but these recipes were popular in 18th-century North Carolina. Joyce Taylor, NC Sea Grant's marine advisory agent at the NCSU Seafood lab is studying colonial recipes of underutilized species like eel, while archaeologists examine Native American fishing camps to understand early seafood consumption.
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Record #:
18992
Abstract:
Shirley Willis spends her day immersed in the past as she takes charge of all the kitchen activities at Tryon Palace in New Bern. Steeped in colonial era foodways and practices, Willis is key in the interpretation of life at Tryon Palace.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring 2002, p3, f
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Record #:
31643
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonial cookery in North Carolina was chiefly English with native ingredients adapted to taste. Most of the cooking involved the extensive use of spices, herbs, and wine, and was done over an open fire or in dutch ovens. Select colonial recipes are presented from “A Tryon Palace Trifle” cookbook by Jeremy North.
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