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4 results for Cookery, American--History
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Record #:
8334
Author(s):
Abstract:
Hinkle uncovered a copy of his grandmother's The New Dixie Cook Book published in 1896. This book gave details on how a housewife could maintain a clean home and a well run kitchen. The book included directions on how to make homemade soaps and suggested using chemicals such as iron sulfate, sprinkled on a clean floor to prevent malarial exhalations. Suggestions were also made about the husband's role in moving heavy objects for cleaning. The book finally suggested that women not work themselves too hard and that they take time to rest and count their blessings.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 52 Issue 10, Mar 1985, p24, il
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Record #:
8942
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Historical Cooking Guild of the Catawba Valley base of operations is the James K. Polk Memorial near Pineville, and they demonstrate cooking techniques and foods of the 18th- and 19th-centuries. One of the group's main goals is having the food taste like it would have over 200 years ago. To add authenticity to their demonstrations, Cooking Guild members dress in period costumes. They also train interpreters at other historic sites. When doing a demonstration, guild members use only those fruits and vegetables that would have been in season and available to colonial cooks.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 1, June 2007, p92-94, 96, 98-100, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
28772
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sean Martin, of Mebane, North Carolina, found the first edition of F.L. "Fanny" Gillette's The White House Cook Book at a Chapel Hill Public Library book sale. The cookbook was a nineteenth-century bestseller, and could be worth five-hundred dollars.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 1, Jan 2017, p16-17, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
31643
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonial cookery in North Carolina was chiefly English with native ingredients adapted to taste. Most of the cooking involved the extensive use of spices, herbs, and wine, and was done over an open fire or in dutch ovens. Select colonial recipes are presented from “A Tryon Palace Trifle” cookbook by Jeremy North.
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