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14 results for Menhaden fisheries
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Record #:
59
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Hinson recounts the Menhaden fishing expeditions along the coast as well as the renowned chanteys sung by the fishermen.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 31 Issue 1, Fall 1991, p18-23, il
Record #:
60
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Luster introduces the African-American chanteymen of the Menhaden fish pulls.
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Record #:
188
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The chanteys of the North Carolina menhaden fishermen, who worked the North Carolina coast in the 19th and 20th centuries, are reminiscent of old field-work songs and gospel songs, and their lyrics reflect the work, religion and loves of the men.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 59 Issue 10, Mar 1992, p25-26, por
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Record #:
2639
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Before hydraulic net-pullers came into use in the 1950s, menhaden fishermen working the state's coasts synchronized their net work by chanty singing.
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NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Spring 1990, p1-3, il
Record #:
3701
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The menhaden fishing industry once stretched from Maine to Florida, but now is centered in four states - Virginia, North Carolina, Mississippi, and Louisiana. The industry peaked in the state in 1956, and the sole plant still operating is in Beaufort.
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Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 7, Oct 1997, p6-13, il, bibl
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Record #:
4936
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Hyrdoacoustic technology that the Navy developed during World War II is assisting North Carolina Sea Grant researchers in assessing the number of menhaden and other fish stocks in state estuaries and sounds and in seeking answers to such questions as the impact of nutrient loading on fish in estuaries. Green discusses current fishery research studies.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Winter 2001, p12-15, il Periodical Website
Record #:
5586
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The Menhaden Chantymen of Beaufort and Carteret Counties sing chanteys that reflect the work, religion, and loves of the men and are also reminiscent of the old field-work songs. In 1991, the group received a N.C. Folk Heritage Award.
Record #:
5796
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North Carolina's last surviving menhaden fishing-and-processing plant is Beaufort Fisheries, located in Beaufort in Carteret County. Latham discusses owner Jule Wheatly's efforts to keep the family-owned operation running and the viewpoints of others who feel a fish factory has no place in 2003 Beaufort, a tourist town of \"tony shops and historic homes.\"
Record #:
6075
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The first menhaden factory was built on Harkers Island in 1865. Since 1910, commercial fishermen have harvested around 160 millions pounds of menhaden annually. The industry peaked in the 1940s and 1950s, but menhaden fishing still accounts for half the total of domestic fish caught annually in the state.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
10050
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Sharpe discusses the menhaden fish, which is known by fifty other names, its history, and its importance to the nation's economy.
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Record #:
19177
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Although often seeing success along the Atlantic coast, menhaden fisheries are now facing large fluctuations in fish populations and the potential of an industry collapse. Within this crisis, North Carolina is a key state, and management of its menhaden fisheries may prove the key preventing losses.
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Subject(s):
Record #:
8887
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Menhaden are used for industrial purposes, rather than as food or game fish. It is one of the state's most important natural resources, and no other species comes close to it in catch tonnage and value. Whitehurst discusses the early development of the industry in North Carolina at locations including Roanoke Island and Harkers Island and the modern industry in the 20th-century.
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Record #:
32205
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For decades, menhaden was North Carolina’s number one commercial fishery by volume. Concerns about overfishing led to changes in harvest allocations and a menhaden reduction fishery. Researchers are investigating the socioeconomic impact of the Atlantic menhaden fishery on East Coast states, and how policy changes might affect the industry.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2018, p18-23, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34788
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Abstract:
In 1865, the first menhaden factory was established on Harkers Island. While today Carteret County is well known for the Beaufort and Morehead City fisheries, Harkers Island still participates in the industry during the warmer summer months. Historically, families living closest to fish factories in Davis and Smyrna, North Carolina, held seasonal positions as crew members and factory workers. In total, forty-four boats were involved in the Harkers Island fisheries which covered areas in the Core Sound. Approximately twenty-six were locally built, although few of these were designed for specific use in the fishery. This article addresses various fishing vessels and the histories of their owners.
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The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer/Fall 2010, p1-5, il