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6 results for Ocracoke Island--Social life and customs
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Record #:
4726
Author(s):
Abstract:
A hurricane is a force to respect and pay attention to for residents of Ocracoke Island, which lies far from the mainland and barely above sea level. Yocum, an Ocracoke Island resident, describes the islanders' reactions to the formation of a storm, preparations for it, and the eventual arrival of the hurricane.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 4, Sept 2000, p107-110, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
20186
Author(s):
Abstract:
Until recently, the fishing community of Ocracoke Island had little direct contact with the outside world. The present population speaks a language unlike anything else heard in Virginia or the Carolinas, maintaining early English influence in idioms and place names.
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Record #:
23901
Author(s):
Abstract:
Figs have grown on Ocracoke Island for over two-hundred years. The fruit is an important part of island history as well as family memories for Ocracoke residents.
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Record #:
27532
Abstract:
On Ocracoke Island, where old-timers claim kin from Blackbeard’s day, a new community is taking shape. Most of the newcomers are from Hidalgo, Mexico, and many are from the same extended family. The two cultures may not speak the same native language, but they understand that the best way to weather change is together.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 84 Issue 9, February 2017, p116-120, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
35857
Author(s):
Abstract:
What made Ocracoke unique from many other NC towns was heard in an accent betraying the area’s English roots. As for what could be seen, they were reasonably priced accommodations for visitors and friendliness of people descended from the original dozen families.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p43-45
Record #:
35945
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Sea Chest staff continued the Weather Station’s briny borne adventures in these entries, chronicled between March-June 1876. Wedged between the ordinary reports of barometric pressure was the extraordinary three week disappearance of Private Hanes. To illustrate the difference between charting the weather during the 19th century and current methods, included were pictures of modern weather forecasting equipment.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 1 Issue 3, Spring 1974, p64-70