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7 results for Ocracoke Island--History
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Record #:
4335
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the most enterprising individual's in the state's history was Ocracoke native Stanley Wahab. Leaving the island to get a higher education and to make his fortune, Wahab returned in the 1930s to bring Ocracoke out of its isolation. Among the numerous things he did were building Wahab Village, the light plant, and ice house; building modern hotels, motels, and cottages; financing the Ocracoke- Hatteras ferry and bus line; and establishing a flying service between Manteo and Ocracoke.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 6, Nov 1999, p18-20, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
12603
Author(s):
Abstract:
A onetime free and independent nation situated twenty miles off the mainland, Ocracoke Island was incorporated into North Carolina in 1770 as a taxable portion of Carteret County. Famous for ponies, pirates, and shipwrecks, Ocracoke remains a popular attraction for locals and tourists alike.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 7, Aug 1957, p12-13, 28-29, il
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Record #:
24693
Author(s):
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The author discusses the development set to take place on Ocracoke, including a newly paved road that would bring in more tourists and change the quaint atmosphere of the area.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 22 Issue 25, May 1955, p13, 29, il
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Record #:
26910
Author(s):
Abstract:
Ocracoke Island residents harvested oysters long before Sir Walter Raleigh’s agents discovered the island. Following the Civil War, however, Ocracokers harvested increasing numbers of the shellfish and nurtured their beds to ensure that there would be plenty of oysters for generations. In 1890, tensions grew between native Ocracokers and outsiders whose dredging practices had virtually destroyed their oyster populations. Eventually, the state passed to protect Ocracoke’s oyster beds from over-fishing.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 83 Issue 12, May 2016, p30, 32, 34, il, por, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
35133
Abstract:
The author composed this ballad about how the island of Ocracoke got its name from legends told to her as she was en route to the island, having to do with the infamous pirate Blackbeard.
Record #:
35857
Author(s):
Abstract:
What made Ocracoke unique from many other NC towns was heard in an accent betraying the area’s English roots. As for what could be seen, they were reasonably priced accommodations for visitors and friendliness of people descended from the original dozen families.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 8 Issue 4, May 1980, p43-45
Record #:
35957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remnants of a famous—and infamous—pirate’s legend were in a familial connection (one of Blackbeard’s wives, a native); his naming of Ocracoke; his death, when he reportedly sailed around the ship seven times after his beheading. Other remnants of the importance of ships were shipwrecks, such as the Carroll A. Derring. As for the origins for other town names, noted were Kill Devil Hills and Chicamacomico, both inspired by the original inhabitants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p34-38