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6 results for Names, Geographical--North Carolina
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Record #:
14067
Author(s):
Abstract:
The article serves as a brief introduction into historic North Carolina town names and how their names changed. Commonly, town names were chosen for an influential individual in North Carolina culture or a city's industry. For example, Wilmington, a shipping town, had its name transformed from New Liverpool, New Town, Newton, and finally Wilmington.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p28-29
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Record #:
14126
Abstract:
Here is a partial list of cities, towns and villages in North Carolina, together with a brief account of how they were given their present names.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 15, Sept 1949, p6-7, 20, f
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Record #:
16510
Author(s):
Abstract:
Local legends and place-names constitute a part of popular history. Although they usually contain more fancy than fact, they possess a charm that appeals to all. This article is a sampling of what North Carolina has to offer in the way of local lore and legend concerning place names.
Record #:
35133
Abstract:
The author composed this ballad about how the island of Ocracoke got its name from legends told to her as she was en route to the island, having to do with the infamous pirate Blackbeard.
Record #:
35151
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article touches on some of the most popular aspects of the Outer Banks. It deals with the origins of its original inhabitants, including people and ponies, some place names and topographic terms, wrecking practices of Nags Head, and more.
Record #:
37709
Author(s):
Abstract:
The naming of state sites such as towns, waterways, and mountains is essential as location markers and identity creators, with purposes enlightening and entertaining. A book mentioned by Parker fulfilling these purposes is William Powell’s Gazetteer: A Dictionary of Tar Heel Places and Their History. Among the discussed town in this book, a professed must for groups such as genealogists, historians, and urban planners are Big Swag, Lizard Lick, and The Frying Pan.
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