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8 results for Powell, William Stevens, 1919-
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Record #:
4169
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William S. Powell, professor emeritus at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, is a leading authority on the state's history. Powell was appointed curator of the university library's North Carolina Collection in 1958 and later joined the history department in 1973. His works and awards are numerous. One of his best-known works is North Carolina Through Four Centuries, a work that has been called the preeminent North Carolina history book.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 2, July 1990, p12-13, por
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Record #:
4930
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On November 27, 2000, William S. Powell received the North Carolina Award, the state's highest civilian honor. Only 176 of the state's citizens have been so honored since the award's inception in 1964. Powell is emeritus professor of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and a distinguished scholar of the state's history.
Record #:
7176
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William \"Bugs\" Powell, who was convicted of the 1991 murder of Shelby convenience store clerk Mary Gladden, was executed at Raleigh's Central Prison on March 11, 2004. Powell is the thirty-fifth person executed in North Carolina since 1984, and the 19th person under Gov. Michael Easley. O'Neill describes Powell's last day.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 22 Issue 11, Mar 2005, p17, 19 Periodical Website
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Record #:
8093
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William S. Powell is a walking repository of all things North Carolina. Powell taught at UNC-CH over thirty years and has edited the NORTH CAROLINA GAZETTEER and the DICTIONARY OF NORTH CAROLINA BIOGRAPHY. In the 1950s, he had an idea for an encyclopedia about the state, but he did not start work on it until the 1980s. This book, the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NORTH CAROLINA, will be published in the fall of 2006. Over 550 people contributed articles to it.
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North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 64 Issue 9, Sept 2006, p8, il
Record #:
10134
Abstract:
William S. Powell is professor emeritus of history at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After World War II, Powell began his life's work in 1948, as a research historian at the North Carolina Office of Archives and History and later spent the bulk of his career at UNC. A leading authority on the people and events that have shaped North Carolina over the last four hundred years, he has written many books on the state's history and geography.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 76 Issue 1, June 2008, p106-108, 110, 112-114, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
19615
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William S. Powell, historian at UNC-Chapel Hill, had an idea for an encyclopedia about the state, but he did not start work on it until the 1980s. This book, the ENCYCLOPEDIA OF NORTH CAROLINA, was published in 2006 and over 500 people contributed articles to it. Smith relates some of the interesting subjects in the book.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 1, June 2013, p126-128, 130, 132, 134, 136, 138-141, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7345
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Because of the work of Dr. William S. Powell, professor of history at UNC-CH, and local historians, North Carolina possesses one of the most comprehensive gazetteers of any state in the nation. Titled THE NORTH CAROLINA GAZETTEER: A DICTIONARY OF TAR HEEL PLACES, the reference book records when the state's places were founded, when their names were first used, and how the place-names came into existence.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 44 Issue 2, Spring 2005, p4-5, il, por
Record #:
37709
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The naming of state sites such as towns, waterways, and mountains is essential as location markers and identity creators, with purposes enlightening and entertaining. A book mentioned by Parker fulfilling these purposes is William Powell’s Gazetteer: A Dictionary of Tar Heel Places and Their History. Among the discussed town in this book, a professed must for groups such as genealogists, historians, and urban planners are Big Swag, Lizard Lick, and The Frying Pan.
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