NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


105 results for Folk music
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 7
Next
Record #:
1590
Author(s):
Abstract:
Beverly Patterson has served as a folklife specialist in the Folklife Office of the North Carolina Arts Council. Her dissertation, \"The Sound of the Dove,\" will include extensive field research she conducted in NC communities in the area of folk music.
Source:
Record #:
4649
Author(s):
Abstract:
Trips when he was a youth to visit relatives along the North Carolina-Virginia border created in New York-born Paul Brown a love for traditional music. In 1980, he left the North to settle in the Mt. Airy area. Brown is a master banjoist, album producer, and radio star, who knows the old music and the people who play it. He has received several North Carolina Arts Council grants to record traditional music.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
4648
Author(s):
Abstract:
Traditional music, which includes ballads, gospel music, and string-bands, is music that is not only shaped by a community, but also varies from place to place. String-band music, played on the fiddle, banjo, guitar, and other stringed instruments, is one of North Carolina's best-known music styles. Through CDs and the Internet, traditional music has gained a wider audience of listeners.
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
4808
Author(s):
Abstract:
From the mountains to the coast, traditional music is alive and well in North Carolina, with numerous festivals highlighting fiddlers and other stringed instrumentalists, dancers, and singers. Gatherings include Fiddler's Grove, now in its 76th year at Union Grove; OcraFolk Festival on Ocracoke Island; Alleghany County Fiddlers' Convention; and the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival, stared in 1927 and held in Asheville.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 20, May 2000, p35-37, il Periodical Website
Full Text:
Record #:
4957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Susan Newberry, Executive Director of PineCone, the Piedmont Council of Traditional Music, and co-worker, Sarah Beth Woodruff, promote and present traditional musicians. PineCone, headquartered in Raleigh, brings touring acts to the Triangle and showcases local and regional musicians. Van Vleck discusses the origin and goals of the organization.
Source:
Full Text:
Record #:
6521
Author(s):
Abstract:
Traditional music has evolved over the past 250 years in the North Carolina mountains, as migrants from a number of countries brought their distinct musical signatures to the area. This interweaving of cultures created the old-time mountain music which is still continuing to evolve and flourish into the twenty-first century. Kunkel lists a number of places where bluegrass performances can be heard weekly, including Clay's Corner (Brasstown); Balsam Mountain Inn (Balsam); Snowbird Mountain Lodge (Robbinsville); Mars Hill College (Mars Hill); and Shindig on the Green (Asheville).
Source:
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
8123
Author(s):
Abstract:
Traditional mountain music has not fared well over the past decades, and among the younger generations, it was fast becoming almost unknown. Helen White, a guidance counselor for eighteen years in the Alleghany County Schools, is an award-winning songwriter/composer and Fiddlers Grove champion fiddler. Aware of this problem, White began a program at Sparta Elementary School called the Junior Appalachian Musicians program. Students have the opportunity to learn the mandolin, dulcimer, banjo, fiddle, or guitar. Schulman discusses the program's progress since its inception in 2000.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p132-134, 136, 138, il Periodical Website
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
12267
Author(s):
Abstract:
Folk music has been passed down for generations spanning two hundred years in western Franklin and eastern Granville Counties in the Kearney-Preddy-Blackley families. Many play guitar, mandolin, fiddle, and banjo interchangeably, practicing a seemingly endless repertoire without a word or note of written music.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 12, May 1975, p20-22, il
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
15497
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bascom Lamar Lunsford, a native of western North Carolina, is praised as an interpreter of the western North Carolina mountaineer. Early in life he learned to play the banjo and fiddle, and to sing the old ballads and dance in accordance with the mountain traditional form, and ever since has been the preeminent pioneer for preserving the folk music, dance, and art of western North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 3 Issue 39, Feb 1936, p3, 21, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
16306
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scott Wiseman with his wife Lula Belle, shared in song the Wiseman view of life on the \"Cliffs of Linville\" with millions of Americans for well over twenty-five years, projecting an image of the region so appealing that they eventually became the most popular folk/country act on the nation's most popular country music radio program, the WLS National Barn Dance.
Subject(s):
Record #:
16301
Author(s):
Abstract:
Linn interviews Mrs. Bertie Dickens, an old time banjo player from North Carolina about her musical style, the folk revival, and her devotion to the old tunes and old ways.
Subject(s):
Record #:
16355
Author(s):
Abstract:
Bascom Lamar Lunsford was called the \"Minstrel of the Appalachians.\" He performed, interpreted, and preserved the ballads, songs, string music, dances, and tales of this region at a time when they were growing less popular, and in doing so, helped bring them back into favor.
Subject(s):
Record #:
16481
Author(s):
Abstract:
There remains a vital body of material yet to be explored, more alive today than ballad-singing or any other oral folk art. That extensive body is the instrumental tradition of fiddle, dulcimer, and five-string banjo music.
Subject(s):
Record #:
20923
Author(s):
Abstract:
Alice Gerrard, now in her 70s, has spent a lifetime documenting, learning about, and performing traditional American music. Not a native of North Carolina, she took up residence here in 1989. However, even before that she had come here countless times to seek out the musicians who had inspired her for decades. Gerrard received a 2010 Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for her devoted promotion and advocacy of traditional American music.
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
23661
Abstract:
Olive Dame Campbell was a teacher in the 20th century who worked to record and preserve the songs of Appalachian culture.
Source:
Subject(s):