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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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19 results for Folk musicians
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Record #:
4808
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From the mountains to the coast, traditional music is alive and well in North Carolina, with numerous festivals highlighting fiddlers and other stringed instrumentalists, dancers, and singers. Gatherings include Fiddler's Grove, now in its 76th year at Union Grove; OcraFolk Festival on Ocracoke Island; Alleghany County Fiddlers' Convention; and the Mountain Dance and Folk Festival, stared in 1927 and held in Asheville.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 20, May 2000, p35-37, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9329
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Traditional folk musician, Clark Jones, recreates the faces and voices of the American past by performing songs and ballads. Jones plays various instruments such as the fretless banjo, autoharp, and hammer dulcimer in presenting American history through song to listeners.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 2, July 1974, p18-20, il, por
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Record #:
24870
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George Holt remembers his friend Joseph Wilson after Joe’s death in May 2015. Wilson had many accomplishments in life from his tenure as the director of the National Council for the Traditional Arts to the dozens of CD’s he produced throughout his life. Wilson has received several honors and will be sorely missed by the folk art community.
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Record #:
16150
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Throughout the mountains of Western North Carolina, craftsmanship collided with folk music to create a unique sound. At the oldest folk festival, started by Bascom Lamar Lunsford in 1928, one can hear the styling's of these artist whose folksongs not only provide entertainment but carry on traditional stories. Examples of the state's most famous folk artist are Marilyn McMinn McCredie of Asheville and Jim Trantham of Canton.
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16151
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Like folk music from the mountains, coastal music tradition preserves the history and culture of those living in the area. Fishermen and sailors preserved tales of adventure in music and some of the favored themes about adventure on the water, whether the ocean, inlets, rivers, or creeks along the eastern shore.
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Record #:
27101
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Abigail Washburn is a songwriter and banjo picker who incorporates the sounds of China into folk music. She is a frequent performer in Chapel Hill, and recently earned a coveted fellowship with the University of North Carolina’s Southern Folk life Collection. Washburn will perform at Chapel Hill’s Memorial Hall on April 17.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 15, April 2016, p24, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27104
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Folksinger Sammy Walker is known as music’s New Dylan. Walker released his first record in 1975 but disappeared from music when he relocated to Hayesville, North Carolina in 1996. With the help of Ramseur Records, Walker has been given a second chance to share his old songs.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 33 Issue 16, April 2016, p16-17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
27454
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Alice Gerrard, a Durham area folk musician, is recognized for her contribution to the arts in the Triangle Area. Gerrard, is the publisher and editor of a national magazine devoted to old-time music called The Old-Time Herald. Gerrard’s life and career are examined and she is praised for her work and musical abilities. Gerrard is best known for her folk songs written from the feminist perspective detailing the everyday life of women.
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Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 19, May 9-15 1990, p7, 12 Periodical Website
Record #:
29010
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David Holt, a folk musician from Alamance County, North Carolina, plays the banjo, slide guitar, and bones. The bones are the actual rib bones from a cow, and an ancient rhythm instrument. History and context are important to Holt, as his music is a form of storytelling.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 14, April 2017, p21, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
35299
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Known now for his Grammy award winning songs, Doc Watson got his start on a radio show in North Carolina. Through an interview, the author followed through on Doc Watsons musical life. This article includes a discography and a poem about his playing by Ardis Kimzey.
Record #:
36970
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A self-proclaimed public folklorist, Duffy started the Music Maker organization to help authentic folk musicians.
Record #:
36955
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Howell is a fiddler who teaches, has contributed over 500 fiddle tunes to university archives, and has immersed himself in the music of Western North Carolina since his childhood.
Record #:
36841
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David Lee began playing music and creating song lyrics when he was a teenager, which led to his launching of his own record company and his own music. Over the years, his career in music represented an important contribution to folklife, especially vernacular music and occupational folklife in North Carolina and the Southeast.
Record #:
35887
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Thomas Burt participated in the full scope of blues history in North Carolina, from childhood to playing in blues festivals.
Record #:
35889
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Ernest East was a traditional fiddler and string band leader who kept alive old-time music.
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