NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


69 results for Folk songs
Currently viewing results 1 - 15
PAGE OF 5
Next
Record #:
60
Author(s):
Abstract:
Luster introduces the African-American chanteymen of the Menhaden fish pulls.
Source:
Record #:
93
Author(s):
Abstract:
The late Anne Locher Warner, author and collector of North Carolina folksongs, was posthumously awarded the North Carolina Folklore Society's Brown-Hudson Folklore award.
Subject(s):
Record #:
1735
Author(s):
Abstract:
Wilkes County native Otis \"Otto\" Wood is one of the more colorful and famous lawbreakers in the state. His exploits, one of which was the murder of a popular Greensboro store owner, inspired the ballad \"Otto Wood the Bandit.\"
Subject(s):
Record #:
2334
Author(s):
Abstract:
The song \"Old Dan Tucker\" was written in 1893, although verses existed before then. Tradition holds that he was born in England in 1714, came to Bath in 1720, and married and moved to Randolph County in 1750. Real or not, he inspired many verses.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 1, June 1995, p31-32, il
Full Text:
Record #:
2528
Author(s):
Abstract:
Born in a log cabin in Jackson County, Felix Ray Allen grew up to be a lawyer, judge, and author, but is most famous for composing the \"Ballad of Kidder Cole\" when he was sixteen.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 5, Oct 1995, p14-15, por
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
2639
Author(s):
Abstract:
Before hydraulic net-pullers came into use in the 1950s, menhaden fishermen working the state's coasts synchronized their net work by chanty singing.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Spring 1990, p1-3, il
Record #:
5586
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Menhaden Chantymen of Beaufort and Carteret Counties sing chanteys that reflect the work, religion, and loves of the men and are also reminiscent of the old field-work songs. In 1991, the group received a N.C. Folk Heritage Award.
Record #:
13100
Author(s):
Abstract:
The tradition of handing down ancient ballads is still occurring in the hills and coastlands of North Carolina. Betty Vaiden Williams became attracted to ballad-singing after a trip to Kentucky, leading her to search for material and collections of Appalachian songs. She has appeared on Bill O'Sullivan's \"Poor Richard\" Almanac program over WUNC-TV and is considered to be the foremost interpreter of North Carolina ballads.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 11, Oct 1955, p16, f
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
16234
Author(s):
Abstract:
In March 2006, the W. L. Eury Appalachian Collection at Appalachian State University's Carol Grotnes Belk Library and Information Commons began a project for the purpose of\r\ndigitizing the folksong collections of two former university icons, Dr. Isaac Garfield (I. G. or \"Ike\") Greer (1881-1967) and Dr. William Amos (\"Doc\") Abrams (1905-1991). The project was entitled \"So Mote It Ever Be: The Folksong Heritage of North Carolina's Northern Blue\r\nRidge Mountains.\" The process would entail scanning each unique textual document in these collections (using North Carolina Exploring Cultural Heritage Online [NC-ECHO] guidelines), transcribing the texts in plain text word processing format, digitally recording the analog field recordings, and compiling metadata for these items\r\n(such as informants, geographic associations, and scholarly classification schemes).
Subject(s):
Full Text:
Record #:
16468
Author(s):
Abstract:
One stanza is apparently all that remains of a North Carolina folksong from the southern Piedmont. But what remains is a sad telling of the murder of Patsy Beasly from Anson County, North Carolina.
Source:
Subject(s):
Record #:
16482
Author(s):
Abstract:
When folksongs are collected they may be classified by two approaches, the typological and the genetic-historical. The typological approach classifies the tunes through their internal characteristics, while the genetic-historical approach classifies them into groups of melodies which are either related in origin or are similar although not actually related.
Subject(s):
Record #:
16486
Abstract:
Kennedy explores the collections of North Carolina ballads and folksongs from the Frank C. Brown Collection of North Carolina Folklore to scholarly books, journals, and anthologies.
Subject(s):
Record #:
16503
Author(s):
Abstract:
One of the most frequently cited explanations of the influence of folk music on cultivated music is one known as the \"seeping up\" theory. The theory states that folk music is the root of cultivated music. Although a sweeping generalization, it perhaps comes closest to having validity when it is related to the art song of the 19th-century.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35129
Author(s):
Abstract:
A song composed by the author complete with the lyrics and sheet music, based upon a story she had read about in a Raleigh newspaper. It was a story about two young girls fighting over a spool of thread, which turned into a family debacle.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35125
Author(s):
Abstract:
Abstract: The story of how a ballad was lost and then found again, although it was never truly lost in the first place. ‘George Collins’ can also be replaced with ‘Tom Collins.’ Complete with the lyrics and sheet music.
Subject(s):