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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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49 results for Ballads
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Record #:
14728
Abstract:
The murder of Laura Foster was supposed to be a very secret affair, but a mountain poet, Thomas C. Land, wrote a song about it, and people in North Carolina and Virginia have been singing about it ever since.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 12 Issue 21, Oct 1944, p11, 19
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Record #:
15116
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Lulu Belle and Skyland Scotty, also known as Mr. and Mrs. Scott Wiseman, are headline radio artists who hail from Western North Carolina. They have achieved considerable fame through the presentation of native mountain songs on the radio.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 8 Issue 37, Feb 1941, p8, 24, f
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Record #:
15417
Abstract:
Tom Collins was the chieftain of one of the most aggressive clans in western North Carolina, as well as a pioneer, and feudal lord of the Great Smokies. Originally from Scotland, the Collins clan swore the English as their enemies, and this continued with Tom, a member of the Watauga Association. He is now memorialized in a ballad and alcoholic drink.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 17, Sept 1936, p2, 22
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Record #:
16312
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Arthur Palmer Hudson, eminent folklorist, describes \"Poor Naomi\" as North Carolina's \"principal contribution to American folksong.\" A part of the Murdered Girl tradition, the ballad has well-known counterparts in other countries and cultures. But \"Naomi Wise\" has evolved from an earlier date and is now widely diffused in North Carolina and beyond, The historical facts behind the ballad, however, have not been adequately explored.
Record #:
16421
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Anglo-American ballads provide a valid means of analyzing people, in certain instances more nearly reliable than such direct methods as asking what they believe. In some cases traditional ballads are even more trustworthy a mirror of life than are compositions form the fine arts.
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Record #:
16495
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A North Carolina ballad tells the story of Alec Whitley, the only man to die by hanging in Stanly County.
Record #:
28541
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Traditional music in North Carolina has been highlighted for excellence and authenticity for years. The history of traditional, old-time, and bluegrass music in Western North Carolina's mountains is detailed. Notable musicians, revolutionary playing styles and innovations, and the music’s origins in Africa, England, Ireland, and Scotland are noted.
Record #:
35012
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Sheet music and lyrics to the ballad “Vandy, Vandy,” about the wooing of a girl during the American Revolution.
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Record #:
35018
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Sheet music and lyrics to the ballad “Old Bangum,” about the hunting of a boar.
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Record #:
35028
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A student who went to Chapel Hill for football brought with him a tune from the mountains where he was from; several stanzas from the song are included.
Record #:
35025
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Sheet music and lyrics to the ballad “Old Veen,” about a good hunting dog now laid to rest.
Record #:
35096
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Two short stories: “The Mule and the Circus Rider,” and “A Man of Honor.” The first story is about the bond a man had with his mule, and the second is a story that preludes the song “Pretty Saro.” Includes cover art.
Record #:
35141
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A ballad about a mother who kills her newborn sons, and then is foretold by some children that she will go to hell in seven years’ time.
Record #:
35129
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A song composed by the author complete with the lyrics and sheet music, based upon a story she had read about in a Raleigh newspaper. It was a story about two young girls fighting over a spool of thread, which turned into a family debacle.
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Record #:
35125
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Abstract: The story of how a ballad was lost and then found again, although it was never truly lost in the first place. ‘George Collins’ can also be replaced with ‘Tom Collins.’ Complete with the lyrics and sheet music.
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