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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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31 results for Animal lore
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Record #:
23689
Author(s):
Abstract:
Animals are wonderful things, some are comforting while others put the fear of God in you. The author gives a variety of tales from Pitt County about animals. In the 1890s there were belled buzzards at the Court House and “Buzzards Roost,” about where Chico’s is now situated. There are stories of large turkeys, eagles and the capturing of “bull Robins” to eat. There were songbirds in Greenville that could whistle popular tunes. There were attacking minks, huge snakes, large hogs, and buzzards who sounded like bears and fooled hunters.
Record #:
35025
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sheet music and lyrics to the ballad “Old Veen,” about a good hunting dog now laid to rest.
Record #:
35038
Abstract:
The article has a preamble that the author had included with her story when she sent it to the editor, who liked it so much he decided to include it. The title of the article alludes to a turtle who wanted to learn to fly.
Record #:
35048
Author(s):
Abstract:
A short story about the superstitions that a screech owl could foretell a death.
Record #:
35084
Abstract:
Told from the perspective of an uncle to some children, this is a story of how a hunting dog was able to track down opossums from laying in a wheelbarrow when he was too old to walk. There is a recipe for pine bark stew at the end.
Record #:
35096
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two short stories: “The Mule and the Circus Rider,” and “A Man of Honor.” The first story is about the bond a man had with his mule, and the second is a story that preludes the song “Pretty Saro.” Includes cover art.
Record #:
35100
Author(s):
Abstract:
A collection of three stories, two dealing with the same witch doctor and the third about a couple who is set upon by a magical creature.
Record #:
35098
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two brief stories about potential signs from the recently deceased.
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Record #:
35127
Author(s):
Abstract:
The story of how a giant worm, also called a dragon, terrorized a town until it was slain. The knight who killed the worm had help from a witch, and he and his family was then cursed for not following the witch’s directions precisely.
Record #:
35153
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article contains the folktales “The Mouse got Drowned in the Cabbage Pot,” and “The Little Round House,” which includes illustrations.
Record #:
35150
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is the author’s take on the origin of the phrase “he ought to be bored for the simples.”
Record #:
35166
Abstract:
This is a story about a woman who accidentally gave her baby to a bear, thinking it was her husband.
Record #:
35165
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author explores the origins of the popular story, “the Wolf, the Fox, and the Well,” along with its many variants.
Record #:
35241
Abstract:
Starting with a brief biography of her father, Ms. Currin recorded several stories, tall tales, and anecdotes that Joe Currin had told. These tales are categorized by hunting and fishing, local characters, numskull tales, and miscellaneous.
Record #:
35249
Abstract:
An African American woman told this story to Mrs. Johnson about a mule that was blind in the time after the Civil War and persevered, and the story teller drew some parallels to racism in their current life in 1955 in Mississippi.
Subject(s):