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5 results for Schooners
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Record #:
2628
Author(s):
Abstract:
Schooners figured prominently in the state's water commerce during the 18th and 19th Centuries. Records of the S. R. Fowle Company of Washington provide important information on the use of these vessels for commerce.
Source:
Tributaries (NoCar Ref VK 24 N8 T74), Vol. Issue 5, Oct 1995, p22-27, il, f
Record #:
35952
Abstract:
Remnants of the ship, sunk between Hatteras Island and Ocracoke in 1913, were reputedly left along the coast. Pieces of the wreckage could also be perceived in its survivors and those left behind, like Mrs. Martha Barnett, to tell the tale.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p57
Record #:
35957
Author(s):
Abstract:
Remnants of a famous—and infamous—pirate’s legend were in a familial connection (one of Blackbeard’s wives, a native); his naming of Ocracoke; his death, when he reportedly sailed around the ship seven times after his beheading. Other remnants of the importance of ships were shipwrecks, such as the Carroll A. Derring. As for the origins for other town names, noted were Kill Devil Hills and Chicamacomico, both inspired by the original inhabitants.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 1, Summer 1974, p34-38
Record #:
36009
Author(s):
Abstract:
Touted as the first four-masted schooner to wreck on the Outer Banks, the George A. Kohler, was destroyed not by the hurricane that had washed it ashore, but the second buyer of its remains. Its value at that time could be measured in the dollars exchanged for its scrap iron and steel. Its present and intrinsic value can be seen in speculations of a shipwreck eight miles from Avon being the sunken schooner.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Fall 1978, p42-45
Record #:
38128
Abstract:
The mystery around the Chowan River was two-fold: Lost Colonists of Roanoke Island; Dorothie, whose remains are believed discovered in Bennett’s Creek. Both parts of the mystery are examined in Don Upchurch’s In Pursuit of Dorothie, the Lost Colony Ship. Part investigation, part speculation, it explores a three-fold explanation for the two-fold mystery. The Dorothie transported the Colonists out of Roanoke, which means they survived beyond 1590, thus offering Croatan a meaning not related to death, but a new life.