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26 results for Saintsing, Katie
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Record #:
17769
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Apple, peach, lemon, or cherry, the flavors have not changed in fifty years, and neither has the recipe developed by G. M. Griffin. Griffin and his cousin Alton Bodenheimer started B&G Pies in 1949 on their back porch in Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Today, B&G workers still make the pies by hand, with the familiar wax paper wrapper.
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19472
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The Battery Park Book Exchange is an eclectic bookstore located in Asheville's Grove Arcade. Customers can enjoy wine, champagne, coffee, or snacks as they wander through the 30,000-volume bookstore. Thomas Wright, who had a long career in industrial chemical manufacturing and restaurant management, wanted to do something different, and in 2004 he bought a bookstore in Little Switzerland. In 2009 he opened his present store in the Battery Park Hotel and in 2011 moved it to its current location.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p76-78, 80-82, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
19611
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Joe and Edna Hill opened Hill's Lexington Barbecue in 1951 in Winston-Salem. At that time there were few barbecue restaurants in town and none served the Lexington style. In 1971 the restaurant moved from a 35-seat restaurant to its present location, which seats 200. At sixty years, Hill's is now a third-generation family business.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 1, June 2013, p69-70, 72, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
21420
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In 1985, Al Priest and Brad Brown created a business called Salem Stained Glass. The company makes new glass windows and restores old ones--some dating back over one hundred years. It remained in Old Salem for sixteen years, then outgrew the space and moved to an 8,400-square-foot building in East Bend.
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21586
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Standing in a quiet section on the edge of Durham, Five Oaks Clubhouse gives a living room appeal to the Forty Acres concerts held there on Saturday nights. The venue is small, seating just over one hundred, which gives the audience the opportunity to sit close to the stage and meet performers during breaks. Performers have come for decades, some known like Tiff Merritt or David Olney, others just beginning careers.
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Record #:
21666
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Brooks did not come from Seagrove, nor did she grow up in a pottery family. She did not begin working with clay until she was thirty-two. Now, twenty years later, she's known as the \"Rooster Queen\" for her creations of stoneware roosters and chickens. Her specialty is Polish chickens that have wild, sea-urchin crests.
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Record #:
21818
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Cratis Williams was born in the mountains of eastern Kentucky. He grew up to be a storyteller, balladeer, linguist, scholar of Appalachia, and teacher. In 1942, he came to Appalachian State in Boone and by 1958 was dean of the graduate school. It was his love of Appalachia, its people and lore, that helped inspire a special library collection, the W.L. Eury Appalachian Collection that is known world-wide.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 81 Issue 11, Apr 2014, p128, 130, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21834
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Saintsing presents interesting facts from different dates about the state's radio pioneers, starting in 1922 when Fred Laxton, Earle Gluck, and Frank L. Bunker began broadcasting in Charlotte from Laxton's house and chicken coop up to 1994 when UNC-Chapel Hill's WXYC became the first radio station to launch a streaming Internet broadcast.
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Record #:
28547
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A photoessay of Beaufort, NC is presented from the perspective of an individual on a bike tour. The Fish House on Front Street, the Old Burying Ground of the Ann Street United Methodist Church, the Sloo/Shepard House, the “Beaufort fence,” and the Harvey W. Smith Watercraft Center at the North Carolina Maritime Museum are among the historic landmarks described and photographed.
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Record #:
29023
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The history, culture, and life in the Montford neighborhood in Asheville is described. The Victorian, Neoclassical, and Colonial Revival architecture of the houses in the neighborhood is described with photographs of houses. The businesses, the streetcar system, cemeteries, and the local theater are also profiled.
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Record #:
29149
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Across the state of North Carolina, innovation, heritage, and hard work are producing three superior products by top-notch companies: Jarrett Bay Boatworks on the coast, Thomas Built school buses in the Piedmont, and Valdese weavers in the mountains.
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Record #:
34281
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Seasoned golfers know that a visit to Pinehurst isn’t just about tee time at the legendary resort. The surrounding village offers rich history, charming shops, and fine restaurants. This article covers the history of the area and highlights visitor attractions.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 12, May 2018, p74-87, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34834
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Honoring the traditional Moravian celebration of liebesmahl, or lovefeast, Winston-Salem community members gather by the thousands each year. A worship service is offered, followed by coffee and sweet buns, candlelight, and music for everyone.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 86 Issue 7, December 2018, p100-117, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34853
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In Buncombe County, a small town with a lively community sits nestled between the mountain tops. Black Mountain has become a top destination in North Carolina, offering restaurants, antique and woodworking shops, and places to relax and enjoy the ambience.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 10, March 2018, p80-95, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
34881
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North Carolina’s coast is home to diverse and unique ecosystems, plants, and animals. The NC Coastal Federation was created in order to protect this area, as well as provide sustainability and restoration projects.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 85 Issue 11, April 2018, p74-93, il, por Periodical Website
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