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9 results for Cape Hatteras Lighthouse--History
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Record #:
4489
Abstract:
Fearing that Federal troops would capture the Fresnel lens in the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Confederate soldiers removed it and shipped it inland to Washington, then Tarboro. With the Union threatening destruction of Washington if the lens wasn't returned, Dr. David Tayloe assumed responsibility for the lens and carried it to safety by boxcar to his home in Townsville in what is now Vance County. Tayloe died in 1884. The whereabouts of the forty-five boxes containing the Fresnel lens remain a mystery to this day.
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Record #:
29860
Abstract:
Unaka Benjamin Jennette, born in 1882, served thirty-eight years in the Lighthouse Service. From 1919 to 1937, Jennette was keeper of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, before the lighthouse was put in the hands of United States Coast Guard. Jennette was responsible for the care and management of the light and station, especially during severe storms and hurricanes.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 3 Issue 3, July 1976, p8-16, por
Record #:
29892
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was completed in 1803 for a cost of $38,450 and kept by Adam Gaskins. But within the first year of service, the lighthouse was seeing problems. Oil cisterns were too small, fires destroyed glass lanterns, and erosion already began to tear away at the tower base. Despite contracts for repair, conditions continued to wear away with complaints of poor quality in the 1820s and 1830s. Although faults were corrected in the 1850s, raising the tower 150 feet and providing a new lighting device, Union forces captured the light in 1861 while Confederate soldiers took the lens. After the war, it was determined to be cheaper to build a new lighthouse than fix this one, so the old tower was torn down.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p2-5, il, por
Record #:
29893
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, now 108 years old, stands only 310 feet from the inlet. As erosion threatens the Outer Banks, the National Park Service is considering three options to save the lighthouse: let nature take its course; move the lighthouse; or build up the beach around it.
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Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 5 Issue 3, Fall 1979, p9-11, por
Record #:
35504
Author(s):
Abstract:
NC's celebration of the US’ birthday wasn’t confined on ship. It also involved cruising by places on land that showcased NC’s contribution to America’s history. There were towns such as Edenton, Bath, and New Bern. It included dwellings like Orton Plantation, the Benjamin Wright House, and Tryon Palace. Also were landmarks such as the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse, Wright Brothers Memorial, and Blockade Runner Museum.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p8-10, 12-14
Record #:
35756
Abstract:
The author provided a Dare County guide with information about the county celebrating its quadricentennial. Cited were the Lost Colony’s history and historic landmarks like Kittyhawk. Described were must see sites like Cape Hatteras, must do recreation like hang gliding off of Jockey’s Ridge; and must visit towns like Southern Shores. As pictorial accompaniment was a hand drawn map of Manteo depicting its historical homes like the Meekins house, businesses like The Old Bank Building, and event sites like the Battle of Burnside.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 7 Issue 4, July/Aug 1979, p30A-30T
Record #:
35962
Author(s):
Abstract:
This Cape Hatteras’ journal edition provided by the Sea Chest staff, covering September 1876, offered a surface impression of days not worth writing home about. Details consisted of barometric pressure, rainfall amounts, telegraph lines repairs, and mild illnesses among the staff. Of historical note, though, may be the photocopied image of September 17th’s handwritten entry.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p67-69
Record #:
35960
Author(s):
Abstract:
Noted details for the tallest lighthouse in America were a drawing of the original lighthouse, the mid nineteenth century renovation that yielded installation of the Fresnel Lens, and its role in the Civil War.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 2 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 1975, p46-47
Record #:
38450
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses how Kevin Duffus, writer and filmmaker searched out the life and history of the man Who built the Hatteras Light.