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23 results for Edenton--History
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Record #:
1925
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Although considered a significant event in North Carolina's Revolutionary period, many questions still surround Edenton's Tea Party of October 25, 1774. Arthur describes the event and addresses questions concerning its authenticity.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 5, Oct 1994, p13-14, il
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Record #:
4965
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The first recorded women's political rally in America took place when Penelope Barker organized fifty women to participate in the Edenton Tea Party on October 25, 1774, in order to send the English government a message of what women in North Carolina were prepared to do to resist repressive laws. Smith recounts the life of this revolutionary woman.
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Record #:
4964
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Edenton was a hotbed of revolutionary fervor when the American nation was coming into being. Among its contributions were a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a signer of the U.S. Constitution, and the Edenton Tea Party. Huso describes the patriots, protestors, and politicians who peopled these momentous times in Edenton.
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Record #:
5977
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On October 25, 1774, Penelope Barker organized fifty women to participate in the Edenton Tea Party, in order to tell the government in England what North Carolina women were prepared to do to resist repressive laws. Griffin discusses the event, which was \"the earliest instance of political activity on the part of women in the American colonies.\"
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New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 3, June 1976, p24-27, il
Record #:
11408
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Dixon describes some of the customs, incidents, and episodes of Edenton's early days.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 1 Issue 10, Aug 1933, p13, il
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Record #:
12311
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On October 25th, 1774, fifty-one women in Edenton met at the home of Mrs. Elizabeth King, signing a resolution not to drink tea until the taxes placed upon the commodity had been removed.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 20, Feb 1958, p15, il
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Record #:
12317
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Queen Anne's Town, also known as the Port of Roanoke, Edenton, is the goober capital of North Carolina as well as the second largest peanut market in the world. Settled in 1658 by colonists from Jamestown, Edenton is a historic town located on the shores of Pamlico Sound.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 25 Issue 20, Feb 1958, p10-11, 33, f
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Record #:
13064
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DeRue recounts his trip to Edenton, North Carolina with anecdotes about its architecture, countryside, and a little bit of history.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 23 Issue 6, Aug 1955, p13, 31-32, f
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Record #:
14140
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October marks the 175th anniversary of the historic Edenton Tea Party which took place on the afternoon of October 25, 1774 at the home of Mrs. Elizabeth King, where 51 patriotic ladies met and signed a spirited resolution.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 20, Oct 1949, p11, 22, il
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Record #:
15459
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There are few towns anywhere that possess the quiet dignity, peace, culture, and serenity that is Edenton's, the historic town located on Edenton Bay at the mouth of the Chowan River. The town was settled about 1658, and throughout the 18th-century was a place of considerable social and political importance.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 4 Issue 42, Mar 1937, p5, 7, 32, f
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Record #:
15665
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Edenton, the county seat of Chowan County, is Our State Magazine's featured Tar Heel Town of the Month.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 79 Issue 7, Dec 2011, p41-44, 46, 48, 50-53, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15920
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State and National citizens mourned the death of Justice James Iredell on October 20, 1799. In August the ill Iredell returned to his Edenton home. No contemporary accounts of his funereal exist but it is believed events were typical of eastern North Carolina with burial within a family cemetery, funeral oration Sunday following burial, and an extravagant funeral feast.
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Record #:
24570
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Joseph Hewes (1730-1779) was a successful merchant who became involved in politics in North Carolina and eventually went on to sign the Declaration of Independence for North Carolina. He served as a representative of the Continental Congress; this article presents his lasting impacts on the state and in Edenton, the town in which Hewes lived.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 39 Issue 22, April 1972, p6-8, il, por
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Record #:
25043
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Edenton has a proud history that became particularly significant in 1774. That history is memorialized during the holidays. Special Christmas events highlight the sacrifices of women and their contributions to the history of the town.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2001, p18-20, il Periodical Website
Record #:
22080
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A history of Edenton, North Carolina with a focus on the establishment and development of St. Paul's Church, clergy, and congregation.
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