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135 results for North Carolina--History--American Revolutionary War, 1775-1783
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Record #:
812
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Abstract:
Speculation centers on the possibility that British general Cornwallis might have surrendered in Chatham County (March 1781) except for the detection of colonial troops that caused the British to flee south to Fayetteville.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 5, Oct 1992, p10, por
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Record #:
1792
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Randolph County's Martha Bell has been hailed as North Carolina's most courageous Revolutionary War heroine.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 3, Aug 1994, p13-14, il
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Record #:
1925
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Although considered a significant event in North Carolina's Revolutionary period, many questions still surround Edenton's Tea Party of October 25, 1774. Arthur describes the event and addresses questions concerning its authenticity.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 5, Oct 1994, p13-14, il
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Record #:
2030
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Lincoln County's Sam Brown was a notorious robber and opponent of the American Revolution who, with his sister Charity, terrorized counties along the Yadkin River and in South Carolina. He was killed in 1780 by an outraged citizen.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 61 Issue 12, May 1994, p17, 19-20, il
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Record #:
2279
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The half-dozen Revolutionary War battlefields in North Carolina are mostly in the Piedmont and mountains. A few, such as Guilford Courthouse, are large, but most represent small encounters between Whigs and Tories at bridges and crossroads.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 62 Issue 12, May 1995, p24-27, il
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Record #:
2444
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Born in Virginia, Nathaniel Rochester moved to Oxford in Granville County at age eleven. Active in the Revolutionary War, this multi- talented patriot was also a legislator, banker, manufacturer, and founder of the city of Rochester, New York.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 63 Issue 3, Aug 1995, p10,13, por
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Record #:
4038
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Benjamin Cleveland was born in Virginia in 1738 and moved, in 1769, to Rowan County. He was a prominent figure in the early history of the area. However, it was as the leader of soldiers from Wilkes and Surry Counties at the Battle of Kings Mountain that he won lasting fame. After the war, he moved to South Carolina and became a county judge.
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Record #:
4207
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North Carolina's Paul Revere was Col. Alexander Mebane. Captured by Tory Colonel David Fanning, Mebane escaped the night of September 12, 1781, and rode through Orange and Alamance Counties to warn the patriots of the Tories' approach. On September 13, Tories and patriots fought at Lindley's Mill, with neither side achieving victory. After the war Mebane's activities included serving in the U.S. Congress, as a member of the Constitutional Convention, and as an original trustee of the University of North Carolina.
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Record #:
4963
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A number of North Carolina citizens participate in recreating the Revolutionary War period with historical accuracy in dress and battle. Reenacting can be expensive, with uniforms and accessories costing thousands of dollars. Revolutionary War reenactments, having between 300 and 500 participants, are smaller than Civil War ones, which can have thousands.
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Record #:
4964
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Edenton was a hotbed of revolutionary fervor when the American nation was coming into being. Among its contributions were a signer of the Declaration of Independence, a signer of the U.S. Constitution, and the Edenton Tea Party. Huso describes the patriots, protestors, and politicians who peopled these momentous times in Edenton.
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Record #:
4961
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For those on the Outer Banks and Carteret County, conflict with the British Navy was continual between 1776 and 1782. Yocum describes the six-year struggle and the patriots who defended coastal Carolina.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 68 Issue 10, Mar 2001, p55-57, 59-61, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4960
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Turnage gives a brief look at what was happening in New Bern, Beaufort, and Bath on the eve of the American Revolution.
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Record #:
4967
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La Vere describes a tour of Revolutionary War sites, with stops at Tryon Palace in New Bern, Moore Creek National Battlefield, the Battle of Guilford Courthouse, and Kings Mountain.
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Record #:
5152
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When General William Lee Davidson was killed in February 1781 in Mecklenburg County during the American Revolution, British soldiers stole his wallet. Years later it turned up in Great Britain's Public Records Office. In 2000, North Carolina \"colonials\" prevailed upon the British for its return. In July 2001, the wallet was placed in the General Davidson exhibit in the museum at the Guilford Courthouse National Park in Greensboro.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 69 Issue 4, Sept 2001, p26,28,30, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5970
Author(s):
Abstract:
Jean Kell, who was doing research in the North Carolina State Archives, discovered a new and unknown chapter in the state's history. One year after Cornwallis surrendered at Yorktown and before the peace treaty was signed, the last battle of the Revolutionary War was fought at Beaufort in Carteret County in April 1782. Kell recounts the battle which ended just seven years, lacking a day, from the opening battle on April 18, 1775.
Source:
New East (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Mar/Apr 1976, p10-14, il