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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Smith, Donna Campbell
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Record #:
4556
Abstract:
In November 1775, Lord Dunmore, Virginia's last Royal Governor, planned to invade North Carolina. Capturing Portsmouth and Norfolk, he next barricaded Great Bridge on the Carolina side, blocking all shipments to the Norfolk port. A small force of Americans marched on Great Bridge. Knowing the force was outnumbered, Betsy Dowdy from Currituck Banks rode her horse Black Bess fifty miles on the night of December 10, 1775, to alert General William Skinner and his men at Hertford. Skinner's force reached Great Bridge in time to help defeat Dunmore on December 11, 1775, and end the invasion threat.
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Record #:
4659
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The wild horses on Shackleford Banks, just off the coast of Carteret County, have survived there for 400 years. They are the descendants of horses brought by Spanish explorers. These tough animals have endured hurricanes, summer heat, insects, and a meager diet. Each year they are rounded up to take a count of the herd and to take blood samples to monitor diseases.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 32 Issue 7, July 2000, p20-21, il
Record #:
4965
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The first recorded women's political rally in America took place when Penelope Barker organized fifty women to participate in the Edenton Tea Party on October 25, 1774, in order to send the English government a message of what women in North Carolina were prepared to do to resist repressive laws. Smith recounts the life of this revolutionary woman.
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Record #:
6645
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History contains many stories of pirates. Mostly, they were men who led crews in plundering ships. There were a few women, however, who chose the life of a pirate. Anne Bonny and Mary Read were two who gained infamous renown on the high seas. Smith recounts their stories.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 71 Issue 12, May 2004, p108-110, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
9744
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Mules were vital to the late 19th and early 20th-century southern farming community. While North Carolina was not known for mule breeding, it was known for mule trading. By 1960, the mule was almost gone, replaced in the state by mechanization. Now the mule is making a comeback in North Carolina.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 2, Feb 2008, p30-31, il
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Record #:
15607
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Campbell discusses the pottery creations of Senora Lynch, a member of the Haliwa-Saponi tribal community in Halifax and Warren counties. She uses the traditional coil method to build her pots from the red clay found locally. Lynch then whitewashes it with layers of liquefied white clay. Intricate designs are etched through the white clay so the red beneath shows through. Her work has been displayed in such places as the Smithsonian National Museum of the American Indian and the N.C. Museum of History.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 43 Issue 10, Oct 2011, p12-13, il
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Record #:
17290
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The U.S. Army continues to rely on the mule to be able to go places even the high-tech equipment cannot. In 2004 The U.S. Army's John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School at Fort Bragg issued a 225-page field manual titled \"SPECIAL FORCES USE OF PACK ANIMALS\".
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 44 Issue 6, June 2012, p18-19, f
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Record #:
17714
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Tobacco baskets, once a common utilitarian product in the tobacco markets, have become a hot commodity as wall art in homes across the country. The first baskets were made in Kentucky, but North Carolina became the primary producer of tobacco baskets by the late 1800s.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 44 Issue 9, Sept 2012, p16, f
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Record #:
20174
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The Quilt Trails of the Tar River, a project of the Franklin County Arts Council, displays quilt blocks around the upper Tar River area of the county and surrounding countryside. These art pieces, placed on historic buildings and structures mark the history, agriculture, and scenic byways of the region.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 45 Issue 7, Jul 2013, p14, il, map, f
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Record #:
20897
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The black bear is the only bear living in North Carolina, and the population in the Coastal Plain and in the state's mountains is at all-time high. This article provides information on the bears in the Coastal Plain that are often seen roaming the farms, communities, and wildlands.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 45 Issue 10, Oct 2013, p14-15, il
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Record #:
21574
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After the Swanquarter National Wildlife Refuge was created in 1932, the Civilian Conservation Corps built the Bell Island Fishing Pier in Hyde County. Over the next seventy years various storms damaged it. In September 1999, Hurricane Floyd destroyed it, but it was renovated in 2003. However, Hurricane Isabel took it out again later in 2003. In 2011, Hurricane Irene forced it to finally close. Again the pier came back. Volunteers led by Dr. John Hale, completed rebuilding it in 2012.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 45 Issue 11, Nov 2013, p18-19, il
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Record #:
28654
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North Carolina ranked second highest in lightning-related casualties from 1959 to 2007. Tips for how to protect yourself from lightning strikes and data about lightning strikes in the state and country are detailed.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 48 Issue 9, September 2016, p16
Record #:
28759
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The fate of the 1500s Roanoke colony is still up for debate. The facts in the case of the colony’s disappearance are presented along with four theories about what happened to the colony and its members.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 49 Issue 7, July 2017, p18-19
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Record #:
30692
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Oyster roasts are an eastern North Carolina tradition during the winter. In this article, the author discusses traditions in Plymouth, North Carolina, the process of roasting oysters, and family oyster recipes.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 46 Issue 12, Dec 2014, p16, il, por
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Record #:
30901
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From the 1800s until recently, commercial fisheries in eastern North Carolina provided herring to people throughout the country and abroad. In an attempt to replenish the herring population, on March 2, 2006, the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission voted to ban the harvest of herring in North Carolina waters for the next ten to fifteen years. This article covers the history and biology of the blueback herring, also known as the river herring.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p32-34, il, por
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