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4 results for Stick, Frank, 1884-1966
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Record #:
22107
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frank Stick, an artist and developer, gets credit for the creation of a distinctive Outer Banks beach house--the flat-top cottage. They come in many sizes and configurations but they all have one commonality--a no-slant roof. After WW II, Stick bought 2,800 acres north of Kitty Hawk, including four miles of oceanfront later known as Southern Shores. That was where most of the eighty cottages were built over the following twenty years. Today about forty remain and they are prized not for their distinctiveness but for their oceanfront property.
Source:
Greenville Times / Pitt's Past (NC Microforms), Vol. 28 Issue 2, January 20 2010, p174, 176, 178, 180, il
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Record #:
6055
Author(s):
Abstract:
Frank Stick lived the last 37 years of his life on the Outer Banks. He is regarded as one of the country's best artists ever to paint outdoor subjects. His book AN ARTIST'S CATCH contains 285 paintings of fresh and saltwater fish. He was a founder of the Izzak Walton League, a promoter of responsible land development on the Outer Banks, and a land donor for the Wright Memorial. But he is practically unknown in his adopted state.
Full Text:
Record #:
32245
Author(s):
Abstract:
Sharpe reviews David Stick’s book "The Outer Banks Of North Carolina."
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 26 Issue 12, Nov 1958, p15-16, il
Full Text:
Record #:
38115
Abstract:
A renowned Eastern North Carolina artist extended his passion for coastal living and people beyond the canvas. Frank Stick can be credited for starting Southern Shores and an architectural style that is part of the town’s identity. Stick's Flat Top cottages, with features such as concrete block walls and solid shutters, could withstand certain weather conditions and extended unoccupancy. His efforts to maintain the lives within those walls extended to overseeing financing and assisting with keeping cottages during owners’ challenging financial times. Today, the community extends its appreciation through preservation efforts such as historic landmark designation and the Outer Banks Community Foundation.